Tag Archive: University of Pennsylvania

Jan 30 2019

Borrowing a Weapon From Leukemia’s Arsenal to Develop New Immunotherapy Approaches

More than six years after Emily Whitehead became the first child to receive chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy, doctors have had remarkable success in turning the immune systems of even more children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) into top-notch fighters against the disease. For some patients, however, these superhero T-cells still fail in their mission to find and fight their cancer targets.

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Jan 25 2019

In the News: PA Device Consortium, Suicide Awareness, Future Fertility, Pneumonia Antibiotics, CAR Hosts Family Fun Research Day

If you’re looking for a spark of inspiration during January’s long and sometimes dreary days, don’t miss this week’s roundup of headlines from in and around Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute. Our scientists’ passionate work in the lab found a spotlight in the mainstream media as “TODAY” featured how our stem cell research can help today’s cancer survivors become tomorrow’s parents. Meanwhile, eye-opening findings from the Lifespan Brain Institute (LiBi) sparked a wider conversation about how pediatricians and parents can stay alert for suicidal thoughts in teens. In more news, a recent study highlighted the need for more antibiotic stewardship in non-children’s hospitals, while a successful device consortium based at CHOP officially became a statewide affair.

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Jan 24 2019

New Grant Awarded to Study Driving Among Autistic Teens

As teens transition to adulthood, being able to get around on their own is a big step toward independence, enabling opportunities for social activities, post-secondary education, and work.

But what about this rite of passage for adolescents on the autism spectrum? How does their experience differ from their peers? These are the types of questions Allison Curry, PhD, MPH, wants to answer with the help of a new grant to fund a groundbreaking project that has the potential to help change the lives of many teens and young adults with autism.

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Jan 21 2019

Building the Evidence Base for Treatment of Severe PARDS

Looking into the eyes of a distressed parent, you want to be able to tell them you’re providing interventions that are based on good evidence for the care of their child. When a gap in knowledge prevents that clinical confidence, Martha Curley, RN, PhD, FAAN, pediatric critical care nurse and research scientist, is there to help find answers.

“The main reason I completed a PhD in nursing science was so I could ask and answer questions relevant to the patient population I cared for as a critical care nurse,” said Dr. Curley, professor of nursing and Ruth M. Colket Endowed Chair in Pediatric Nursing, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, and professor of anesthesia and critical care medicine, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

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Jan 7 2019

Studying ‘The Beginning’ to Understand What Comes Later: Q&A With J. Christopher Edgar, PhD

One-month-old Connor only dimly perceives the world around him. Just two months later, when he sees his mother’s beaming face or hears his father’s hearty laugh, he smiles with recognition. And by the time Connor reaches his first birthday, he’s starting to put one foot in front of the other and verbally communicate with his parents. Just what accounts for these significant changes?

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Dec 18 2018

When Are Obsessive Compulsive Symptoms a Sign for Serious Psychiatric Conditions?

The findings:

Obsessive compulsive symptoms (OCS), which include intrusive thoughts, urges, mental images, and repetitive behaviors, are common in community youth. But while OCS are often considered developmentally appropriate, researchers in the Lifespan Brain Institute (LiBi) at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania have found that some OCS patterns – specifically bad intrusive thoughts – have stronger associations with serious psychiatric conditions such as depression, psychosis, and suicidal ideation. Other types of OCS, such as those surrounding cleaning or contamination, were not associated with major psychiatric conditions.

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Nov 21 2018

In the Gut: Therapeutic Discovery in the Microbiome

 


The Fifth Annual Microbiome Symposium: Microbes, Metabolomics, and Modern Diseases highlighted the synergy of the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and University of Pennsylvania scientific community to produce incredibly novel and exciting research.

Hosted by the PennCHOP Microbiome Program, the Nov. 8 symposium brought experts from the fields of microbiology, immunology, gastroenterology, cell and molecular physiology, and pathology together with a common goal: to share developments from their labs with the end game of improving outcomes for individuals with chronic disease.

Larry Jameson, MD, PhD, executive vice president, University of Pennsylvania Hospital System and dean of the Perelman School of Medicine, welcomed attendees to the packed Gaulton Auditorium.

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Nov 16 2018

In the News: Vital-Sign Monitors for Infants, Manufacturing Precision Tools for Medicine, Annual Report of Injury Prevention Studies, Penn-CHOP Nutritional Research

At Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, we know innovation sometimes requires a second look at seemingly harmless practices and a willingness to break out of the status quo. In this edition of In the News, learn how an unnecessary emergency room visit prompted Christopher Bonafide, MD, to examine the use of physiological monitors for healthy infants, and read about a bold move toward future innovation with the grand opening of our new Clinical Manufacturing Facility for precision medical tools. Additionally, the Center for Child Injury and Prevention Studies’ Annual Report highlights important safety work with real-world implications, a new Penn-CHOP collaboration aims to investigate nutritional interventions to treat disease, and a CHOP patient gets the surprise of a lifetime in the name of autism awareness.

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Nov 2 2018

In the News: Fertility After Childhood Cancer, Restoring Vision, NYAS Podcast, Obesity and Autism, Genes in Childhood Epilepsy

The scientific wonder of stem cell research and its implications for medicine have come a long way in the last decade: At Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute, our investigators’ innovative use of stem cell science to approach complex pediatric conditions continues to inspire for their potential to improve outcomes in children’s health. In our latest news roundup, learn about novel stem cell research from our Cancer Center and Division of Urology that aims to preserve the future fertility of boys who undergo childhood cancer treatment. Discover a new project co-led by a CHOP neurology researcher that takes a stem cell approach to restore vision cells in blind dogs.

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Oct 8 2018

The Science Behind Gene Therapy: Creating Breakthroughs One Gene at a Time

For more than 20 years, researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania have been at the forefront of taking a system perfected by nature — a virus — and transforming it into breakthrough gene therapies for rare single-gene diseases. CHOP was the first pediatric research institution to develop chimeric antigen receptor T cell (CAR-T) therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In this approach, viral vectors are used to modify a patient’s own T cells, training them to track down and eliminate the circulating cancer cells.

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