Tag Archive: Struan Grant

Sep 6 2019

In the News: Cancer Drug Approval, Chief of Infectious Diseases, Genetics and Obesity, Police Encounters and Autism, Rare Disease Q&A, Stress Resilience

It’s time to say goodbye to summer and settle into days with a little more structure (and a little less humidity). It’s also Childhood Cancer Awareness month, a special time to raise awareness for pediatric cancer research and recognize the researchers who work toward discovering causes and developing treatments. In this week’s research news roundup, learn how scientists in our Cancer Center contributed to the approval of a new cancer drug to treat solid and brain tumors, join us in welcoming our new Chief of Infectious Diseases, learn about new discoveries into stress resilience, and more.

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May 29 2019

2019 Scientific Symposium Sparks Discussions on Big Data

By Jillian Rose Lim, Barbara Drosey, Sharlene George, and Nancy McCann

Researchers exchanged big ideas about big data at the 2019 Scientific Symposium, an event that brought together the bright minds of our Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia research community. A lineup of thought-provoking speakers from CHOP and the University of Pennsylvania shared presentations corresponding with the symposium’s themes, “Big Data” and “Today’s Discoveries and Tomorrow’s Possibilities.” 

“The goal [of this symposium] is to highlight the tremendous advances by CHOP investigators in the booming fields of computational biology, data science, and genomics,” said Yi Xing, PhD, chair of the event and director of the Center for Computational and Genomic Medicine at CHOP. 

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Apr 5 2019

In the News: Genes Causing Osteoporosis, Residents’ Longer Work Shifts, Pediatric Spinal Deformity, Ventilation Strategy for Preterm Infants, Pediatric Cell Atlas

As spring slowly arrives here in Philadelphia, take a deep breath of fresh air and catch up on our research that’s been making publishing news. This week we’re covering genes that cause osteoporosis, the effects of longer work shifts for first-year residents, and the project to map every cell in a child’s body. You’ll also learn about respiratory support in preterm infants and research results that Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia investigators published in the Public Library of Science (PLOS) One.

Risk Genes for Osteoporosis May Lead to Future Treatments

Scientists have harnessed powerful data analysis tools and three-dimensional studies of genomic geography to implicate new risk genes for osteoporosis, the chronic bone-weakening condition that affects millions of people. Knowing the causative genes may later open the door to more effective treatments.

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May 19 2017

Sports Medicine Research Award, Concussion Research Collaboration, Stephan Grupp, PAS Meeting, Type 1.5 Diabetes

CHOP Research In the NewsOur latest research news roundup carries a hint of summer and exciting new beginnings.

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Mar 25 2016

CHOP Research In The News: Quantum Award, Bone Health, Antibiotics and Weight Gain

CHOP Research In the NewsNews abounds this first week of spring, and we bring you fresh insights from new scientific studies cultivated by experts at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. But first, take a moment to celebrate a special award that recognizes the dedication of pediatric oncologist Richard Aplenc, MD, PhD, MSCE.

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Mar 18 2016

CHOP Research In the News: Obesity, PTSD, and Alice in Wonderland

CHOP Research NewsWelcome to our latest weekly summary of research news from The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia! This has been a full week, including multiple studies of genetic influences on weight in childhood, a useful autism research explainer, findings on long-term impacts of congenital heart disease, and a neurological phenomenon with a literary namesake.

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Dec 22 2015

Going Back to the Future of Obesity and Osteoporosis

osteoporosisMany of today’s healthy children and teens will develop later-onset chronic conditions including heart disease, cancer, and osteoporosis.

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