Tag Archive: sickle cell disease

May 8 2019

Exploring Exosome-Mediated Stem Cell Engraftment for Hemoglobinopathies

By Barbara Drosey

Intent on pursuing a career in fetal surgery since age 11, Meghana V. Kashyap, MD, a general surgery resident at the University of Nebraska Medical Center, reached out to five prominent fetal surgery centers to determine where her two years of dedicated research, allowed by her training program, would best be spent.

“Every program I interviewed with had done their training under Dr. (Alan) Flake and his colleagues here at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia,” Dr. Kashyap said. “I thought, why not train at the institution that produced these other surgeon-scientists?”

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Feb 18 2019

From Sci-Fi to Real Life, Stefano Rivella, PhD, on the Verge of Discovery

Bundled up in winter clothes from head to toe, 7-year-old Eric rolls a snowball around the backyard with his older brother, building it into a sizeable snowman. Mom, watching from her perch at the kitchen window, can hear her boys laughing — until — Eric doubles over in acute chest pain, crying out for her. Rushing to his side, she wonders how many more of these excruciating episodes and trips to the hospital Eric can endure.

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Jul 27 2018

In the News: ROP Screening Tool, Sickle Cell Disease Target, PolicyLab Keynote, 2018 St. Baldrick’s Grants

It’s still a month before teachers and students are officially back to school, but here at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute, you can learn something new every day. In this edition of our biweekly news roundup, discover the latest findings from our ophthalmologists on how clinicians should choose to screen premature babies for a potentially blinding eye disorder, find out how CRISPR-based technology allowed scientists to reveal insights into sickle cell disease, and prepare for an educational and exciting speech from the recently announced keynote speaker at PolicyLab’s upcoming 10th Anniversary Forum

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Jun 1 2018

CIRP Webinar, IBD Symposium, NICU Antibiotics, Breakthrough Fundraising, NORD Award

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Dec 15 2017

Brain Plasticity, Hemophilia B Gene Therapy, Stem Cells and SCD, Medical Cannabis for Autism, PA Rare Disease Advisory Council

The year 2017 might be coming to a close, but research continues to ramp up at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, with exciting developments in the fields of brain science, hemophilia, gene therapy, and more. In this week’s roundup of headlines, we take a look at remarkable reports from CHOP and Penn Medicine about the brain’s ability to reorganize itself after limb amputation, the first U.S. effort to observe the use of medical cannabis for children with autism, and exciting innovations to improve sickle cell disease treatment presented at the 59th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition. Read on to discover more about these brilliant breakthroughs. 

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Sep 22 2017

AAP Conference, PCORI Sickle Cell Research, Eagles Autism Challenge, Anxiety and Autism, New Immunotherapy Target for Neuroblastoma

CHOP Research In the NewsNotable awards, new autism initiatives, and a novel approach to managing sickle cell disease are all part of this week’s roundup of research news.

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Aug 15 2014

Forced Looping Viable Strategy to Reverse Globin Switch

globinInvestigators at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia are exploring a new gene therapy approach that aims to reactivate the production of fetal hemoglobin as a potential intervention for patients with sickle cell disease.

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Jan 14 2014

Flipping a Gene Switch Reactivates Fetal Hemoglobin, May Reverse Sickle Cell Disease

Hematologists have long sought to reactivate fetal hemoglobin as a treatment for children and adults with sickle cell disease (SCD). Researchers at CHOP have manipulated key biological events in adult blood cells to produce a form of hemoglobin normally absent after the newborn period.

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