Tag Archive: epidemiology

Sep 24 2018

Global Health Researchers Finding Ways to Improve Children’s Cancer Survival Rates

Every child with cancer deserves the greatest opportunity to be cured, no matter where in the world they live. This overarching sense of purpose took Julianne Burns, MD, a third-year pediatric Infectious Diseases fellow, from Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia to the Hospital Infantil Dr. Robert Reid Cabral (HIRRC) in the Dominican Republic for four weeks this summer to conduct much needed infectious disease research.

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Sep 18 2018

Studying Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Leukemia: Q&A with Richard Aplenc, MD

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the second most common leukemia in children, affects different populations of pediatric patients in different ways. With the support of a new Epidemiology Grant from Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation, Richard Aplenc, MD, PhD, assistant vice president and chief clinical research officer at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, is leading a powerful research project based on the automated extraction of data to learn more about racial and ethnic disparities observed in African American children with AML.

“We’ve known for a long time that African American children do worse with treatment for acute myeloid leukemia than non-African American children,” Dr. Aplenc said. “But we’ve never really understood why that is, and there are a lot of different possibilities.”

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Feb 14 2017

CPCE Pilot Grant Awardees Want to Know: What Works Best?

CPCETwice a year, the CPCE Pilot Grant Program offers funding opportunities to CHOP investigators conducting clinical effectiveness studies. The recipient of the Fall 2016 Pilot Grant Awards are Ruth Abaya, MD, MPH; Yeh-Chung (Dan) Chang, MD; and Sheila Quinn, DO.

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Sep 20 2016

Do Food Allergies Increase the Risk of Asthma? Key Questions From a New Study

asthma allergyMost of us know that unlucky kid — and some of us were that unlucky kid — who was stuck with more allergies than the rest of the class, from peanuts and eggs to asthma and hay fever. Is it a coincidence that often the kid carrying an inhaler might also be carrying an EpiPen?

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