Tag Archive: communication

Sep 28 2018

New Website Opens Digital Door for Improving Parent, Teen Communication


Editor’s Note: It’s an exciting time for the Center for Parent and Teen Communication (CPTC) at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. The Center launched a new website, www.parentandteen.com, offering timely, easy to understand articles, videos, podcasts, slideshows, quizzes, and more for both parents and teens. For parents and caregivers, topics include: developmental forces that shape adolescent behavior, strategies for improving parent-teen communication, avenues for supporting character strengths that lead to a successful life, and best approaches for disciplining and monitoring. We took the opportunity to ask Kenneth Ginsburg, MD, MSEd, co-founder and director of programs for the CPTC, to tell us more about the Center and its research efforts.

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Jan 11 2018

Is Autism Associated With Stronger or Weaker Brain Connections?

The Finding:

In a new study that sheds light on a longstanding paradox in autism research, investigators showed how children and teens with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can have both stronger and weaker brain connections than their typically developing peers. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) revealed that while individuals with ASD have weaker brain connections compared to their peers overall (a measure known as absolute connectivity), they simultaneously exhibited stronger connections within the brain networks implicated in attention and social cognition compared to their other networks (a measure known as relative connectivity). Additionally, the more these brain connections differed from typical development, the more severe the child’s ASD symptoms seemed to be.

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Jul 8 2015

With PCORI Support, CHOP Expert Will Assess ADHD Portal

ADHDFunded by a $2.1 million award from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, CHOP's James Guevara, MD, MPH, will study the comparative effectiveness of an electronic portal vis-à-vis in-person communication for ADHD.

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