Tag Archive: Clinical Vector Core

Nov 16 2018

In the News: Vital-Sign Monitors for Infants, Manufacturing Precision Tools for Medicine, Annual Report of Injury Prevention Studies, Penn-CHOP Nutritional Research

At Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, we know innovation sometimes requires a second look at seemingly harmless practices and a willingness to break out of the status quo. In this edition of In the News, learn how an unnecessary emergency room visit prompted Christopher Bonafide, MD, to examine the use of physiological monitors for healthy infants, and read about a bold move toward future innovation with the grand opening of our new Clinical Manufacturing Facility for precision medical tools. Additionally, the Center for Child Injury and Prevention Studies’ Annual Report highlights important safety work with real-world implications, a new Penn-CHOP collaboration aims to investigate nutritional interventions to treat disease, and a CHOP patient gets the surprise of a lifetime in the name of autism awareness.

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Oct 8 2018

The Science Behind Gene Therapy: Creating Breakthroughs One Gene at a Time

For more than 20 years, researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania have been at the forefront of taking a system perfected by nature — a virus — and transforming it into breakthrough gene therapies for rare single-gene diseases. CHOP was the first pediatric research institution to develop chimeric antigen receptor T cell (CAR-T) therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In this approach, viral vectors are used to modify a patient’s own T cells, training them to track down and eliminate the circulating cancer cells.

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Aug 31 2017

A Moment to Remember: First-of-its-Kind Cancer Treatment Approved by FDA

It was a pivotal moment that has turned into a new era for cancer immunotherapy. On April 17, 2012, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia researchers for the first time treated a pediatric patient with a cellular therapy that used her own reprogrammed immune cells, called T cells, to attack her aggressive form of blood cancer.

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