Tag Archive: blindness

Dec 14 2018

In the News: Gene Therapy EU Approval, Long-Term CAR T-cell Effectiveness, 10 Years of CAR, AHA Conference, CAR T-cell Resistance

The end of the year inevitably arrives with a handful of things to celebrate, from memorable moments to astounding achievements to milestones made. With less than three weeks left in 2018, our list of celebratory moments at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute continues to grow, as this edition of our biweekly research news roundup shows. Read on to learn about two gene therapies pioneered at CHOP and the University of Pennsylvania that recently reached important milestones, a novel discovery from our scientists that could help to improve cancer immunotherapies, the 10-year anniversary of our Center for Autism Research, and more.

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Dec 5 2018

Out of the Darkness: New Grant Awarded to Study Stem Cell Therapy for Vision Restoration

Dora can feel the brisk chill of the wind on her cheeks and hear the crunch of fallen leaves underfoot, but gone from sight are the autumnal colors. An inherited disease that causes blindness robbed her of vision years ago. But, if John Wolfe, VMD, PhD, has anything to do with it, she’ll see the vibrant reds and golden yellows of the season, once again.

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Nov 2 2018

In the News: Fertility After Childhood Cancer, Restoring Vision, NYAS Podcast, Obesity and Autism, Genes in Childhood Epilepsy

The scientific wonder of stem cell research and its implications for medicine have come a long way in the last decade: At Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute, our investigators’ innovative use of stem cell science to approach complex pediatric conditions continues to inspire for their potential to improve outcomes in children’s health. In our latest news roundup, learn about novel stem cell research from our Cancer Center and Division of Urology that aims to preserve the future fertility of boys who undergo childhood cancer treatment. Discover a new project co-led by a CHOP neurology researcher that takes a stem cell approach to restore vision cells in blind dogs.

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Jul 27 2018

In the News: ROP Screening Tool, Sickle Cell Disease Target, PolicyLab Keynote, 2018 St. Baldrick’s Grants

It’s still a month before teachers and students are officially back to school, but here at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute, you can learn something new every day. In this edition of our biweekly news roundup, discover the latest findings from our ophthalmologists on how clinicians should choose to screen premature babies for a potentially blinding eye disorder, find out how CRISPR-based technology allowed scientists to reveal insights into sickle cell disease, and prepare for an educational and exciting speech from the recently announced keynote speaker at PolicyLab’s upcoming 10th Anniversary Forum

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Jul 17 2014

Study Shows Evaluators Can Screen for Eye Disease Remotely

retinopathy of prematurityA study published in JAMA Ophthalmology shows trained evaluators who studied retinal images transmitted to computer screens successfully identified newborn infants likely to require a specialized evaluation for retinopathy of prematurity.

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Jan 16 2014

Repairing DNA, One Cell at a Time

blindnessHigh is one of the world’s leading experts in gene therapy, which has long been a “next big thing” in medicine: Take a person with a devastating genetic disease and replace their nonfunctional gene with a normal one — a cure built right into your DNA.

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May 2 2013

CHOP, Penn Gene Therapy Trial for Blindness Honored

blindnessA groundbreaking clinical trial of gene therapy for a form of congenital blindness, sponsored by The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia in collaboration with Penn Medicine, was recently recognized with the Distinguished Clinical Research Achievement Award from the Clinical Research Forum, an organization of clinical research centers, industry, and volunteer groups.

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