Tag Archive: big data

Sep 30 2019

Balancing the Bench and the Bedside: Q&A With Jay Storm, MD

During Childhood Cancer Awareness Month and year-round, we love to see our patient families invested in our cancer research at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia – whether it’s by attending events like the  Parkway Run & Walk or just sheer curiosity about the projects our scientists have in the works.

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May 29 2019

2019 Scientific Symposium Sparks Discussions on Big Data

By Jillian Rose Lim, Barbara Drosey, Sharlene George, and Nancy McCann

Researchers exchanged big ideas about big data at the 2019 Scientific Symposium, an event that brought together the bright minds of our Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia research community. A lineup of thought-provoking speakers from CHOP and the University of Pennsylvania shared presentations corresponding with the symposium’s themes, “Big Data” and “Today’s Discoveries and Tomorrow’s Possibilities.” 

“The goal [of this symposium] is to highlight the tremendous advances by CHOP investigators in the booming fields of computational biology, data science, and genomics,” said Yi Xing, PhD, chair of the event and director of the Center for Computational and Genomic Medicine at CHOP. 

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Mar 26 2019

How Does a New Computational Method Transform Public Big Data Into Knowledge of Transcript Splicing?

By Sharlene George

The findings:

A new computational framework called deep-learning augmented RNA-seq analysis of transcript splicing (DARTS) uses deep-learning based predictions to add dimension to the wealth of information available in public RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) big data sets. DARTS allows researchers to gain new insights into RNA and protein complexity, particularly for genes with low expression.

Who conducted the study:

A team from the Center for Computational and Genomic Medicine at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia conducted the study including Yi Xing, PhD, who is the Center’s director, and first authors Zijun Zhang and Zhicheng Pan, who are PhD students.

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Mar 4 2019

New Computational Method Sheds Light on How Genetic Variants Alter RNA Processing

By Sharlene George

A key moment occurs in any gripping novel that sets in motion the characters’ doom or fortune. In the context of gene regulation, RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play a similar pivotal role determining ribonucleic acid molecules’ (RNAs’) fate by guiding post-transcriptional events. This process is essential to interpretation of genetic code and its function in protein synthesis, which are the building blocks of any organism.

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Dec 3 2018

From Big Dreams to Big Data in Pediatrics: Q&A With Jeff Pennington

Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and its Research Institute has the ability to explore pediatric data better than almost anywhere else in the world to solve challenging problems in child health. In his new role as associate vice president and chief research informatics officer at the Research Institute, Jeff Pennington sees a “don’t miss” window opening where CHOP is at the right time with the right tools, infrastructure, people, and skills in place to launch Arcus, an integrated data science platform.

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Nov 13 2018

New Center for Computational and Genomic Medicine Harnesses Technology and Big Data for Discovery

The Human Genome Project’s successful completion 15 years ago gave us a new genomic lens to read our 20,000 or so protein-coding genes. Since then, a surge in next-generation sequencing technologies is generating new insights daily that sharpen our view of how the human genome works.

Yi Xing, PhD, was on the cusp of this revolution in medicine as he finished his PhD training in molecular biology and bioinformatics at University of California Los Angeles (UCLA). His research career began to rise during the incredible takeoff of big data science, and he became a prominent scientist in this cutting-edge field. The immense challenges of synthesizing diverse data sets from many sources come with vast opportunities to change pediatric medicine, which is why Dr. Xing is eager to assume his new role as the inaugural director of the Center for Computational and Genomic Medicine at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.

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Aug 31 2018

CHOP Leads Big Data Collaboration to Uncover Pathways Between Cancer and Birth Defects

When most of us think about cancer, a number of factors — from smoking, to sun exposure, to specific organs where a disorder develops — might jump to mind. But for Adam Resnick, PhD, co-founder of the Center for Data Driven Discovery and Biomedicine (D3B) at CHOP, in order to unravel the inextricable link between childhood cancer and other rare conditions, we must visualize pediatric cancer as a process.

As a single-cell zygote proliferates into a 37 trillion-cell being, something happens in the course of its development — a dysfunction, a deviance, a DNA-driven decision — that underpins not just the development of life-changing birth defects, but a potential vulnerability to childhood cancer as well.

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Jun 7 2018

Bring on the Noise: Genomics Experts Think Through Big Data at SAGES

The Symposium on Advances in Genomics, Epidemiology and Statistics (SAGES) has a winning formula for success: Bring together an interdisciplinary group of scientists who are all working toward the same goal of understanding the genetic basis of human disorders. Close to 200 SAGES attendees gathered June 1 at the Smilow Center for Translational Research for a dynamic opportunity to explore a wealth of ideas and make connections with colleagues from diverse areas of expertise.

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Mar 4 2016

CHOP Research In the News: DNA Scrunching, Video Games, Smart Drugs

CHOP Research In the NewsThis week’s stories from The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia include the use of big data to understand a tiny molecular mechanism central to how cells function, a clinical trial of video games for improving attention, and the neurodevelopmental effects of so-called “smart drugs.”

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