Tag Archive: basic research

Oct 13 2017

Translational Research Workshop Bridges Gap Between Bench Research and Clinic

If you glance at a diagram of the continuum of translational research, the arrows point orderly to five phases — from basic research to improving population health. Rarely, however, is the business of discovery so neatly aligned. It takes unexpected twists and turns, as attendees at this week’s Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Translational Research Workshop for Basic Scientists heard from experienced investigators who shared lessons that they’ve learned while pursuing their scientific endeavors.

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Nov 19 2015

Dancing Eyes Brought a Research Team Together

T-cells attacking cancer cell illustration of microscopic photosIt started at the end of a long day. Jessica Panzer, MD, PhD, then just a few weeks into her pediatric neurology residency at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, was about to go home. Instead, she was called to the emergency room to consult on a 3-year-old girl who could barely walk.

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Sep 23 2015

New Research Consortium Aims to Identify Drugs for Pediatric Cancers

The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and four other high-profile oncology research programs plus a coordinating center joined the new Pediatric Preclinical Testing Consortium (PPTC) launched by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to help researchers identify drug candidates for pediatric clinical trials.

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Aug 4 2015

New Ways Needed to Predict, Treat Relapsed Leukemia

leukemiaDespite advances in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment, between 15 and 20 percent of children who achieve an initial complete remission will relapse. They may need more intensive therapy or alternative approaches, but physicians do not yet have a reliable way of predicting which patients are at high-risk of relapse.

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Jul 9 2015

Researchers Aim to Find New Pathway Interactions in Colorectal Cancers

colorectal cancerColorectal cancer mainly exists in people older than 50, but it also can occur in young adults who have a genetic condition called familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP).

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May 20 2015

Pilot Grant to Support Genetic Eosinophilic Esophagitis Investigation

Eosinophilic EsophagitisCHOP's Antonella Cianferoni, MD, PhD, recently received a two-year, $140,000 grant to study the genetic underpinnings of the severe food allergy eosinophilic esophagitis.

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May 9 2015

Pathways in Cornelia de Lange Syndrome Open New Possibilities

Cornelia de Lange SyndromeFinding out Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) causes could be extremely important to understanding human development at all levels, which is why Ian Krantz, MD, medical director of the Center for Cornelia de Lange Syndrome and Related Diagnosis at CHOP, and his colleagues have dedicated the past two decades to research that is piecing together the basic biology of CdLS.

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May 8 2015

Cookies for Kids’ Cancer Funds Support Rapid Discovery of New Therapies

Cookies for Kids' CancerCookies for Kids’ Cancer, a nonprofit foundation dedicated to pediatric cancer research, uses the proceeds from its cookie sales and other fundraising events to provide grants to support the work of scientists at five of the nation’s leading pediatric cancer centers.

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May 4 2015

Precision Medicine Trial to Focus on Children With Advanced Cancers

cancer treatmentA new research opportunity under development as part of its Project:EveryChild, called Project:EveryChild Pediatric MATCH, aims to use the power of precision medicine to potentially provide investigational therapies for some children with advanced cancers.

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Mar 2 2015

Finding New Genetic Syndrome Ends Medical Odyssey for Families

LETA_DNACHOP medical geneticist and researcher Ian Krantz, MD, has been a tireless detective in his efforts to find out what genetic syndrome could be behind Leta’s constellation of symptoms.

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