Tag Archive: American Society of Hematology

Jul 26 2019

In the News: Rheumatology Award, South Jersey Summer Institute, Rural Health, ASH Prize, Army Families

It will take more than a little heat and humidity to stop our researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia from making an impact in and around the community: In this edition of our biweekly news roundup, we cover a recent event that introduced South Jersey teachers to our innovative research, congratulate two scientists on new awards that recognize their contributions to rheumatology and hematology, and share how faculty members at PolicyLab are discussing the implications of their work in the realms of policy and public health. 

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Dec 14 2018

In the News: Gene Therapy EU Approval, Long-Term CAR T-cell Effectiveness, 10 Years of CAR, AHA Conference, CAR T-cell Resistance

The end of the year inevitably arrives with a handful of things to celebrate, from memorable moments to astounding achievements to milestones made. With less than three weeks left in 2018, our list of celebratory moments at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute continues to grow, as this edition of our biweekly research news roundup shows. Read on to learn about two gene therapies pioneered at CHOP and the University of Pennsylvania that recently reached important milestones, a novel discovery from our scientists that could help to improve cancer immunotherapies, the 10-year anniversary of our Center for Autism Research, and more.

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Sep 18 2018

Studying Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Leukemia: Q&A with Richard Aplenc, MD

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the second most common leukemia in children, affects different populations of pediatric patients in different ways. With the support of a new Epidemiology Grant from Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation, Richard Aplenc, MD, PhD, assistant vice president and chief clinical research officer at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, is leading a powerful research project based on the automated extraction of data to learn more about racial and ethnic disparities observed in African American children with AML.

“We’ve known for a long time that African American children do worse with treatment for acute myeloid leukemia than non-African American children,” Dr. Aplenc said. “But we’ve never really understood why that is, and there are a lot of different possibilities.”

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Dec 15 2017

Brain Plasticity, Hemophilia B Gene Therapy, Stem Cells and SCD, Medical Cannabis for Autism, PA Rare Disease Advisory Council

The year 2017 might be coming to a close, but research continues to ramp up at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, with exciting developments in the fields of brain science, hemophilia, gene therapy, and more. In this week’s roundup of headlines, we take a look at remarkable reports from CHOP and Penn Medicine about the brain’s ability to reorganize itself after limb amputation, the first U.S. effort to observe the use of medical cannabis for children with autism, and exciting innovations to improve sickle cell disease treatment presented at the 59th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition. Read on to discover more about these brilliant breakthroughs. 

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Dec 16 2016

CHOP Research In the News: Global Trial of CTL019, Gene Therapy for Hemophilia, Child Abuse Within Military, New Radiologist-in-Chief, ADHD in Preschool

CHOP Research In the NewsYour holiday season has been hectic, no doubt. Catch up with an early gift from us: Our biweekly roundup of research news from Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia comes with all the trimmings!

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Dec 8 2015

Latest Findings Add Insight Into Targeted Cancer Immunotherapy

cancerResearchers at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia reported their latest results from their studies of an investigational personalized cell therapy for a highly aggressive form of cancer, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).

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