Tag Archive: adolescents

Jun 28 2019

In the News: Driving and Autism, Epilepsy Learning System, Youth-onset Diabetes, Mitochondrial Research Award, MicroRNA and Obesity, Well-being Measures

Even as the lazy days of summer approach, our researchers are busy making news with innovations in their respective fields. In this edition of In The News, a multidisciplinary study lauds parental support as key for autistic adolescents who want to drive, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia announces a pioneering partnership in the Epilepsy Learning Healthcare System, and the TODAY study shows youth-onset type 2 diabetes leads to later complications. 

For more summer reading, Dr. Douglas Wallace is honored for mitochondrial research; scientists find a correlation among gut microbiota, microRNA 181 (miR-181), and obesity; and a validated pediatric tool for self-reported outcomes becomes available for clinical use.

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Jun 10 2019

Researchers Study How To Enhance Self-management of Survivors of Childhood Cancer

by lavigne

Adolescents and young adults with a history of cancer may seem prepared to handle anything that comes their way and want to move on with their lives. Unfortunately, too often what gets left behind is cancer survivors’ commitment to engaging in long-term follow-up care. As their recommended annual appointment rolls around, they may not be motivated to take it seriously when they’re asymptomatic and feeling fine. 

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Feb 14 2019

Researchers Explore How to Promote Firearm Safety in Emergency Department

Pediatric emergency department physicians work at a fast pace to problem solve and provide the right treatment at the right time. Embracing this sense of urgency, physician-researchers with Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia’s Violence Prevention Initiative (VPI) are studying if the ED could be an ideal atmosphere for clinicians to educate patients and families about the risk of firearms, both for unintentional injury and for suicide.

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Jul 10 2018

Do Oral Antibiotics Play a Role in Kidney Stone Prevalence Increase in Youth?

The Findings: Children and adults treated with five classes of oral antibiotics have a significantly higher risk of developing kidney stones. The five classes include oral sulfas, cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, nitrofurantoin, and broad-spectrum penicillins. Patients who received sulfa drugs were more than twice as likely as those not exposed to antibiotics to have kidney stones. For broad-spectrum penicillins, the increased risk was 27 percent higher. The strongest risks appeared at younger ages and among patients most recently exposed to antibiotics. The risk of kidney stones decreased over time but remained elevated several years after antibiotic use.

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Jul 13 2017

CTL019 Wins FDA Panel Support, Driving with ADHD, High School Football, New Genetic Syndrome, Teen Bone Growth, Missed Nursing Care

CHOP Research In the NewsCAR T-cell therapy tops this week’s research roundup, with news about the experimental immunotherapy designed to re-engineer a patient’s cells to fight cancer making late-breaking and captivating headlines across the nation.

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May 3 2017

We Push the Boundaries of Science When Research Fields Intersect

Our researchers whose work is at the cross section between injury and neurodevelopmental or intellectual disabilities have a unique vantage point when studying the driving safety of adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The Research Institute is home to two of the most highly regarded autism and pediatric injury research centers in the world.

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Apr 25 2017

Do Teens With Autism Get Their Driver’s License?

One in three adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) acquires an intermediate driver’s license, and the majority does so in their 17th year. An intermediate license permits drivers to travel with restrictions, such as driving curfews and limits on the number of passengers.

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Feb 12 2016

CHOP Research In The News: Teaching About Human Milk, Teen Depression

CHOP Research In the NewsImproving exclusive human milk feedings for NICU infants is a major public health issue in India, where Diane Spatz, PhD, RN-BC, FAAN, director of The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia’s Breastfeeding and Lactation Program, spent two weeks teaching nurses and physicians about human milk and implementation of her 10 Step Model for Human Milk and Breastfeeding in Vulnerable Hospitals.

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Jan 26 2016

Positive Adult Connections Play Protective Role for At-Risk Youth

Positive Adult ConnectionAn adolescent’s life is full of ups and downs, and research has shown that it can be helpful for them to have adults who they can turn to in times of trouble. Unfortunately, youth living in low resource urban neighborhoods may face adversity on a daily basis, which means that these positive adult connections can be especially valuable to them.

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Jan 19 2016

Teens’ Rising Risk of Kidney Stones: Four Things to Know

kidney stonesIn a marked increase, kidney stones, a painful condition that historically mainly affected middle-aged white men, are growing more common in the U.S. Perhaps surprisingly, that rise is particularly steep among adolescent, female, and African-American populations.

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