Tag Archive: Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia

Apr 22 2019

Parents Pair Up With Urban Families to Ease Early Intervention Access

By Barb Drosey

James Guevara, MD, MPH, a passionate advocate for kids’ health and well-being, greets visitors with a warm smile and soft voice. A founding member of PolicyLab at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, and senior fellow at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania Center for Public Health Initiatives, Dr. Guevara wants to help families connect with early intervention (EI) services to help children experiencing developmental delays get the best start in life.

“The earlier children access EI services, the easier it is to ameliorate developmental delays so, by the time they start kindergarten, they are on a more level playing field with their peers,” Dr. Guevara said.

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Apr 17 2019

On the Road to Better Treatments for Obese Asthmatics

By Nancy McCann

Ten year-old Jack looks longingly out his living room window, yearning to play kickball with his friends. But mom doesn’t want his asthma to flare up, which it tends to do when he runs around. As much as he wants to go outside, he won’t, because he knows how uncomfortable he gets when his chest starts to tighten. Instead, Jack spends hours on the couch in front of the television, playing video games.

This reinforcing cycle keeps churning — exercise and outdoor play are great for combatting Jack’s obesity, but they’re bad for his asthma. Sitting around begets more weight troubles, but it doesn’t cause him breathing discomfort. Around and around it goes.

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Apr 3 2019

Collaborators Uncover Genetic Basis of Very Early Onset Inflammatory Bowel Disease

By Barbara Drosey

It’s easy to see how Marcella Devoto, PhD, and Judith Kelsen, MD, work so well together. Their work is imperative, but they also are quick to laugh while falling in and out of side conversations about their research in the sort of shorthand longtime collaborators enjoy.

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Mar 22 2019

In the News: Mitochondrial Gene Variance, Killing Cancer Cells, NICU Stress Effects, Visually Impaired Driver Safety

In this week’s news roundup, there’s a lot to be proud of as our researchers make impactful discoveries, such as new-found variability in a mitochondrial disease-causing gene and encouraging findings about an antibody-drug conjugate that targets a surface protein expressed in childhood neuroblastomas, effectively killing cancer cells. Wanjiku Njoroge, MD, and colleagues followed mothers of very preterm infants to determine stress in the NICU and its effects five years later, and Allison Curry, PhD, MPH, is changing perceptions about visually impaired drivers.

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Feb 22 2019

In the News: Sleep Problems and Autism, Opioid Overprescription, Food Pharmacy, Gun Violence Prevention, Proof-of-Concept Award, and Lung Cells in Fetal Development

By Nancy McCann

We start this edition of In the News with a look at the prevalence of sleep problems in young children with autism spectrum disorder, a study on opioid prescriptions for kids with broken elbows, and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia’s grand opening of the Healthy Weight Food Pharmacy and the research behind it.

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Feb 18 2019

From Sci-Fi to Real Life, Stefano Rivella, PhD, on the Verge of Discovery

Bundled up in winter clothes from head to toe, 7-year-old Eric rolls a snowball around the backyard with his older brother, building it into a sizeable snowman. Mom, watching from her perch at the kitchen window, can hear her boys laughing — until — Eric doubles over in acute chest pain, crying out for her. Rushing to his side, she wonders how many more of these excruciating episodes and trips to the hospital Eric can endure.

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Feb 14 2019

Researchers Explore How to Promote Firearm Safety in Emergency Department

Pediatric emergency department physicians work at a fast pace to problem solve and provide the right treatment at the right time. Embracing this sense of urgency, physician-researchers with Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia’s Violence Prevention Initiative (VPI) are studying if the ED could be an ideal atmosphere for clinicians to educate patients and families about the risk of firearms, both for unintentional injury and for suicide.

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Feb 8 2019

In the News: Newly Linked Epilepsy Genes, Pediatric Safety Research, Teen Intern Recruits for Research, CHOP Visits UAE, Trends in Opioid Prescription

This week, we highlight the results of innovation powered by collaboration, within Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute and around the globe. A multicenter, international consortium revealed genes newly linked to epilepsy, while CHOP CEO Madeline Bell visited Dubai for an interchange of knowledge and technology at the largest medical conference in the world. Closer to home, the Children’s Hospitals’ Solutions for Patient Safety Network, comprised of 135 hospitals in the United States, published its findings on the most effective targets for pediatric patient safety research, and a high school intern helped researchers recruit participants for a teen driving study. Learn about the latest trends in pediatric opioid prescription, and get an update on the Delaney family, whose conjoined twin daughters were separated with painstaking care by a multidisciplinary team at CHOP.

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Feb 1 2019

Why Should We Automatically Reanalyze Genetics Test Results?

The findings:

The human genome contains approximately 20,000 genes, and exome analysis focuses on about 7,000 genes known in medical literature to be clinically associated with a disease. Currently, up to 70 percent of exome test reports are negative or inconclusive. But suppose at a later date a researcher discovers a gene that could be causative of the disease? 

Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia researchers led by Avni Santani, PhD, associate professor of Clinical Pathology, developed a useful tool for automated reanalysis that facilitates efficient reevaluation of nondiagnostic clinical exome sequencing (CES) samples using up-to-date literature published after the initial exome analysis was performed. They demonstrated this methodology enabled identification of novel diagnostic findings in almost 16 percent of previously nondiagnostic samples. 

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Jan 24 2019

New Grant Awarded to Study Driving Among Autistic Teens

As teens transition to adulthood, being able to get around on their own is a big step toward independence, enabling opportunities for social activities, post-secondary education, and work.

But what about this rite of passage for adolescents on the autism spectrum? How does their experience differ from their peers? These are the types of questions Allison Curry, PhD, MPH, wants to answer with the help of a new grant to fund a groundbreaking project that has the potential to help change the lives of many teens and young adults with autism.

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