Tag Archive: Children’s Brain Tumor Tissue Consortium

Sep 30 2019

Balancing the Bench and the Bedside: Q&A With Jay Storm, MD

During Childhood Cancer Awareness Month and year-round, we love to see our patient families invested in our cancer research at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia – whether it’s by attending events like the  Parkway Run & Walk or just sheer curiosity about the projects our scientists have in the works.

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Jul 12 2019

In The News: Self-Driving Cars; Mother-Infant Dyad; Families’ Health Insurance; One Drug, Two Bone Diseases; Proteomic Dataset; Cancer Patients Quit Tobacco

The Fourth of July fireworks may be over, but sparks are still sizzling (along with the weather) here at the Research Institute as we celebrate our researchers’ published work. Take a look at who’s been in the press lately. This week we’re covering the decision factors behind allowing children to ride alone in self-driving cars, commentary on improving perinatal care in the United States, and why private sector working families are turning to Medicaid and CHIP for health coverage. 

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May 24 2018

Collaborative Discovery Supports Next Wave of Pediatric Brain Tumor Innovation

Editor’s Note: Childhood brain tumors remain some of the most difficult to treat cancers, especially because of current therapies’ long-term side effects for the survivors. In honor of Brain Tumor Awareness Month, Adam Resnick, PhD, director of the Center for Data-Driven Discovery in Biomedicine (D3b) at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, is our guest blogger. He brings us up to date on how the CHOP-led consortia, working with patients, families, and partnering institutions, has witnessed first-in-kind initiatives and innovative clinical trials aimed at personalized, precision-based approaches for brain tumors that are redefining the scientific landscape of research and therapeutic translation.

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Feb 28 2018

Better Biobanking a Best Bet for Rare Disease Research

Editor’s Note: Families facing a rare disease diagnosis often do not know where to turn first in their search for the most advanced treatments and potentially a cure for their children. Only 5 percent of rare diseases have a treatment approved by the Food and Drug Administration, according to the National Organization for Rare Disorders. This is due in part to the lack of high quality biospecimens for research.

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