Dec 10 2018

Single Cell Technology Zooms In for Clearer View of High-risk Pediatric Cancers

The voice of Kai Tan, PhD, rises and quickens when he considers the potential of single cell technology to zero in on pathogenesis of cancer and other diseases. He points to the attention this course of research is receiving via funding from organizations such as the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Moonshot Initiative and the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative’s Human Cell Atlas project. In fact, Dr. Tan is himself is a valued contributor to the single cell revolution, and his work will continue with a recent NCI grant for the development of a pediatric tumor cell atlas.

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Dec 7 2018

Center for Autism Research Reaches a Decade of Scientific Insights, Leadership

The Center for Autism Research at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia is celebrating a decade of conducting autism research to understand the causes of autism spectrum disorder, develop effective therapies, and train the next generation of master clinicians and scientists in state-of-the-science best practices for autism screening, diagnosis, and treatment.

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Dec 5 2018

Out of the Darkness: New Grant Awarded to Study Stem Cell Therapy for Vision Restoration

Dora can feel the brisk chill of the wind on her cheeks and hear the crunch of fallen leaves underfoot, but gone from sight are the autumnal colors. An inherited disease that causes blindness robbed her of vision years ago. But, if John Wolfe, VMD, PhD, has anything to do with it, she’ll see the vibrant reds and golden yellows of the season, once again.

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Dec 3 2018

From Big Dreams to Big Data in Pediatrics: Q&A With Jeff Pennington

Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and its Research Institute has the ability to explore pediatric data better than almost anywhere else in the world to solve challenging problems in child health. In his new role as associate vice president and chief research informatics officer at the Research Institute, Jeff Pennington sees a “don’t miss” window opening where CHOP is at the right time with the right tools, infrastructure, people, and skills in place to launch Arcus, an integrated data science platform.

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Nov 30 2018

In the News: Sleeping Toddlers, No-Smoking Policies and Lower Blood Pressure, Dr. “Be My Sugar,” Leigh Syndrome, Healthcare Heroes Award

It’s that time of year, again! Can you believe it? Before you get caught up in yards of wrapping paper, strings of lights, and mile-long “to-do” lists, take a moment to read this week’s roundup of research news from Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. You’ll discover best-practices to get toddlers to sleep — and stay asleep — just in time for the holidays! Learn the identity of our sweeter-than-sugar doctor, the correlation of lower blood pressure and smoke-free policies, and the latest on Leigh Syndrome.

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Nov 28 2018

Global Health Researchers Address Neurodevelopmental Impact of HIV in Botswana

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Nov 21 2018

In the Gut: Therapeutic Discovery in the Microbiome

 


The Fifth Annual Microbiome Symposium: Microbes, Metabolomics, and Modern Diseases highlighted the synergy of the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and University of Pennsylvania scientific community to produce incredibly novel and exciting research.

Hosted by the PennCHOP Microbiome Program, the Nov. 8 symposium brought experts from the fields of microbiology, immunology, gastroenterology, cell and molecular physiology, and pathology together with a common goal: to share developments from their labs with the end game of improving outcomes for individuals with chronic disease.

Larry Jameson, MD, PhD, executive vice president, University of Pennsylvania Hospital System and dean of the Perelman School of Medicine, welcomed attendees to the packed Gaulton Auditorium.

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Nov 16 2018

In the News: Vital-Sign Monitors for Infants, Manufacturing Precision Tools for Medicine, Annual Report of Injury Prevention Studies, Penn-CHOP Nutritional Research

At Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, we know innovation sometimes requires a second look at seemingly harmless practices and a willingness to break out of the status quo. In this edition of In the News, learn how an unnecessary emergency room visit prompted Christopher Bonafide, MD, to examine the use of physiological monitors for healthy infants, and read about a bold move toward future innovation with the grand opening of our new Clinical Manufacturing Facility for precision medical tools. Additionally, the Center for Child Injury and Prevention Studies’ Annual Report highlights important safety work with real-world implications, a new Penn-CHOP collaboration aims to investigate nutritional interventions to treat disease, and a CHOP patient gets the surprise of a lifetime in the name of autism awareness.

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Nov 13 2018

New Center for Computational and Genomic Medicine Harnesses Technology and Big Data for Discovery

The Human Genome Project’s successful completion 15 years ago gave us a new genomic lens to read our 20,000 or so protein-coding genes. Since then, a surge in next-generation sequencing technologies is generating new insights daily that sharpen our view of how the human genome works.

Yi Xing, PhD, was on the cusp of this revolution in medicine as he finished his PhD training in molecular biology and bioinformatics at University of California Los Angeles (UCLA). His research career began to rise during the incredible takeoff of big data science, and he became a prominent scientist in this cutting-edge field. The immense challenges of synthesizing diverse data sets from many sources come with vast opportunities to change pediatric medicine, which is why Dr. Xing is eager to assume his new role as the inaugural director of the Center for Computational and Genomic Medicine at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.

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Nov 9 2018

How Can Gene Editing Breakthroughs Help Prevent Congenital Disease Before Birth?

The findings:

In a first-of-its kind study, scientists performed prenatal gene editing in animals to prevent a lethal metabolic disorder and effectively open the door for similarly treating congenital diseases in humans before birth. Using gene editing technology, the team successfully targeted a gene that regulates cholesterol levels to lower cholesterol and, additionally, turned off the effects of a mutation that causes a lethal liver disease called hereditary tyrosinemia type 1 (HT1) in mice.

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