Dec 27 2017

Our Most Read Stories of 2017 Bring Back the Wonder of Childhood

It was a big year for children’s health: We celebrated the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s approval of the world’s first chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cell therapy this September, followed closely by approval of the very first gene therapy to treat inherited blindness this month — both of which have their roots at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania. But besides the big headline-making breakthroughs (brilliant as they are), we wanted to know what other stories captivated our readers in 2017.

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Dec 21 2017

Groundbreaking Gene Therapy Approved for Inherited Retinal Blindness

More than a decade of studies led by researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania culminated this week with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s approval of an innovative one-time gene therapy product indicated for the treatment of patients with a rare, inherited form of retinal blindness.

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Dec 20 2017

Planting Seeds of Positivity for Children Exposed to Violence

The health and well-being of the children we treat truly starts at home where they live and play, and with the parents or caregivers whom they return to every day. At Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute, Brittany Schliep, a clinical research finance manager, is fighting for healthier and happier homes by helping to prevent the impact of domestic violence (DV) on children in her hometown of Gloucester Township, N.J.

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Dec 15 2017

Brain Plasticity, Hemophilia B Gene Therapy, Stem Cells and SCD, Medical Cannabis for Autism, PA Rare Disease Advisory Council

The year 2017 might be coming to a close, but research continues to ramp up at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, with exciting developments in the fields of brain science, hemophilia, gene therapy, and more. In this week’s roundup of headlines, we take a look at remarkable reports from CHOP and Penn Medicine about the brain’s ability to reorganize itself after limb amputation, the first U.S. effort to observe the use of medical cannabis for children with autism, and exciting innovations to improve sickle cell disease treatment presented at the 59th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition. Read on to discover more about these brilliant breakthroughs. 

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Dec 12 2017

Positioning PolicyLab for the Future

Editor’s Note: As PolicyLab’s 10th anniversary as a Center of Emphasis within Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute arrives in 2018, we invited Director David Rubin, MD, MSCE, and Deputy Director Meredith Matone, DrPH, MHS, to reflect on PolicyLab’s progress and future directions. Read on to get a glimpse of the four inventive research portfolios that will achieve the Center’s “research-to-action” goals.

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Dec 7 2017

In Memory of Carole Marcus, MBBCh, Pioneering Pediatric Sleep Researcher

Curiosity is one of the driving traits of a stellar researcher, and throughout her career, pioneering sleep researcher Carole Marcus, MBBCh, had an unwavering fascination with sleep medicine. Upon her unexpected recent death, we take a look back over her years of exceptional leadership and clinical research as director of the Sleep Center at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the CHOP Clinical and Translational Research Center/Center for Human Phenomic Science. She also worked closely with colleagues at the University of Pennsylvania as associate director of the Institute for Translational Medicine and Therapeutics, and was an outstanding and generous mentor for many fellows and faculty, having earned the CHOP Faculty Mentor Award in 2015.

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Dec 5 2017

Three Key Questions for Breaking Into Translational Research

Breakthroughs in basic science build the foundation for clinical research and our treatment of children’s health. Many basic scientists, however, find themselves wanting to play a more active role in connecting their lab discoveries from the bench to the bedside. The Office of Postdoctoral Affairs at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia held a Q&A panel, “How to Break Into Translational Research As a Basic Scientist,” in October as part of their week-long, biannual Translational Research Workshop.

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Dec 1 2017

World Aids Day, Be My Sugar Award, Puberty and Bone Density, Stents vs. Shunts

This first of December, we’re recognizing World Aids Day by sharing the latest research from Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia investigators who partnered with the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Botswana, and the Botswana Ministry of Health through the Botswana-UPenn partnership, in order to address sub-Saharan Africa’s HIV/AIDS epidemic. Alongside their findings published last week, our news roundup also includes special congratulations to Diva De León-Crutchlow, MD, on a “sweet” new award from Congenital Hyperinsulinism International, and novel research findings from our investigators who study cardiology, genetics, and puberty.

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Nov 28 2017

CChIPS’ Annual Report Highlights Consortium’s Unique Synergy

The rapid translation of research results into new products, policies, and programs is a key part of the Center for Child Injury Prevention Studies’ (CChIPS) mission to spur innovations that keep children safe and healthy.

Each year, the Industry Advisory Board (IAB) of the CChIPS funds a portfolio of child safety-focused research projects. During the 2016-2017 CChIPS project year, the IAB funded 13 completed projects, spanning areas of focus including child-restraint design and performance, consumer/driver behavior, crash avoidance and autonomous vehicles, vehicle restraint performance, and crash test dummy biofidelity. Snapshots of these projects are available in the newly released 2017 CChIPS Annual Report: “Safe and Sound.”

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Nov 22 2017

A Heartfelt Thank You

Our days and weeks are packed – sometimes to the point of overflowing – with projects, meetings, and the regular day-to-day work that propels our discoveries and supports our investigators and their teams.

In the midst of being busy today and planning for tomorrow, it’s important for me to take a moment to express my gratitude to everyone for what they do to support the CHOP Research Institute.

While funding is certainly a critical factor in our flourishing research program, it has little significance without you – our innovative investigators and research teams, our dedicated support staff, our generous donors, and our inspiring patients and families. I am thankful for each and every one of you for your tireless support. Regardless of how you support the Research Institute – through your work, generosity, advocacy, and goodwill – please know that we could not accomplish what we do without you.

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