Apr 6 2018

U.S. News & World Report, David Barrett, Driving & ADHD, Bike Safety, Concussion Research

Outdoor sports, biking, and bustling streets might be welcome signs of warmer weather and longer days, but they’re also research topics studied rigorously by investigators at our Center for Injury Research and Prevention (CIRP) in their quest to ensure safer environments for children and families. In this week’s roundup of Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia research headlines, learn about a new study from CIRP into the various causes and mechanisms of youth concussions beyond contact sports, discover cool technology that allows scientists to study how cyclists move and make decisions on urban streets, and find out how the CIRP driving simulator is helping to advance what we know of teen driving behaviors. On top of that, we congratulate the Cancer Center’s Dr. David Barrett on a new award from Stand Up to Cancer and offer big congratulations to our Department of Pediatrics’ continued success!

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Apr 3 2018

CHOP Ranked Nation's Top Pediatrics Department for 2019

With enormous pride and admiration, we are thrilled to share the news that for the sixth year in a row, U.S. News & World Report has ranked the Department of Pediatrics at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania first place in pediatric medical education — a top spot shared with Harvard University this year. Once again, the high honor illustrates the excellent commitments our faculty make every day in training physicians and researchers for a future filled with breakthroughs. Congratulations to our amazing Pediatrics Department!

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Apr 3 2018

Broad vs. Narrow-spectrum Antibiotics: What's the Best Choice for Common Childhood Infections?

The Finding:

Bigger isn’t always better, especially when it comes to combating pediatric infectious disease. Researchers conducted a study that compared the effectiveness of broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment to narrow-spectrum antibiotic treatment for common childhood acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs). Children who received narrow-spectrum antibiotics had a higher health-related quality of life and a reduced risk of antibiotic side effects as compared to children receiving broad-spectrum antibiotics, according to data from this study.

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Mar 29 2018

Heart to Heart: How the Readman Family Supports Cardiac Research

Two-year-old Jax Readman might not remember the two open heart surgeries he had at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia for a complex cardiac defect, but his mom, Haley, looks forward to the day that she can share with Jax all of the positive, powerful, and pretty cool things the family has done to support heart research since his birth.

From the benefits they’ve hosted to support the CHOP Cardiac Center, to the galas attended to share their story for the March of Dimes, Jax will have no shortage of happy memories about how he and his family help to raise money and spread awareness for research into single ventricle heart defects.

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Mar 27 2018

Violence Prevention Initiative Reinforces How Research Helps to Keep Kids Safe

Editor’s Note: As part of a pediatric healthcare organization, the Violence Prevention Initiative (VPI) within the Research Institute addresses the antecedents to violence and supports an environment where children feel safe to learn, play, and develop. VPI accomplishes this by implementing hospital-wide and community-based programs, performing clinical research in bullying and violence prevention, providing trauma-informed trainings, and advocating for public policy changes that have implications for children and families.

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Mar 23 2018

Soy-based Formula Infants, Bone Strength Genetics, Infant Epilepsy, Intravenous Arginine, Concussion Conference

Along with the first day of spring (though the weather here doesn’t look quite like it just yet), the month of March marks National Nutrition Month — a great time to learn about how research is informing the impact of a healthy diet and lifestyle. This week’s roundup of Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia research headlines includes a recent study from the Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition at CHOP along with a handful of fascinating scientific discoveries that tell us new things about pediatric health across the lifespan (and across the skeleton, as you’ll see). Read on for summaries of the latest research from our investigators — from bone health to neurology to mitochondrial medicine and beyond.

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Mar 21 2018

Lifespan Brain Institute Symposium Digs Into Roots of Mental Illness

Leaders of the Lifespan Brain Institute (LiBI) brought together experts in child and adult psychiatry, and basic and translational science, to delve into the origins of mental illness, during the Institute’s first symposium, “Pathological Antecedents to Neuropsychiatric Disorders.” Throughout the day, 200 attendees learned about how the typical trajectory of brain development and function is derailed in psychiatric disorders at various points throughout life — perhaps as early as in the womb.

LiBI is uniquely positioned as a broad collaboration between Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania that supports research across the fetal-adult continuum, which is a pillar of CHOP Research Institute’s strategic plan.

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Mar 15 2018

Four Women in Science: What Inspires Them to Make Breakthroughs

In the halls and history of Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and its Research Institute, you don’t have to search far to find role models who thrive in science fields that have been, historically, underrepresented by women.

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Mar 9 2018

Lung Stem Cells, 2021 Congress of the ISTH, Backseat Safety, Pan-Cancer Analysis, Gates Cambridge Scholarship

From the discovery of stem cells that multiply after a lung injury, to new data that advances how we think about (and treat) childhood cancer, our first roundup of March is packed with discovery. Read on to learn how our researchers stay at the forefront of pediatric science with a new study that expands what scientists know about the body’s extraordinary ability to regenerate, a pan-cancer project that distinguishes how cancer develops in children versus adults, and a handful of updates on what our investigators have in store for the near future.

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Mar 6 2018

Is an Uncommon Genetic Mutation Linked to Vitamin D-dependent Rickets?

The Findings:

Researchers identified a genetic mutation in CYP3A4 that is linked to vitamin D-dependent rickets (VDDR), a childhood disorder associated with impaired growth and skeletal mineralization. Scientists already knew about two other genetic forms of VDDR, but this third kind is caused by a gain-in-function mutation — a random genetic change that confers a new function on a gene — that leads to accelerated inactivation of vitamin D metabolites. This is a new insight into vitamin D metabolism.

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