Mar 14 2019

CHOP Ranked Nation’s Top Pediatrics Department for 2020

For the seventh year in a row, U.S.News & World Report has ranked the Department of Pediatrics at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania as the number one pediatrics department in the United States. 

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Mar 11 2019

In the News: National Clinical Research Award, Vitamin D and Obesity, Modern Healthcare Women Leaders, Mitochondrial Disorder Drug, Predicting Sepsis

Last week marked International Women’s Day (March 8), and while we recognize the remarkable women in science and healthcare at the Research Institute every day of the year, it seems especially fitting that this news roundup features some of those role models as they receive accolades and awards. Hematology researcher, Lindsey George, MD, was honored for her breakthrough work in developing a gene therapy for hemophilia B, while our CEO and President, Madeline Bell, ranked on the Top 25 Women Leaders list by Modern Healthcare. Meanwhile, in other news, researchers published findings on obesity and vitamin D, the use of machine learning for early sepsis detection, and a promising drug to treat some mitochondrial disorders.

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Mar 8 2019

Intelligence Meets Inspiration: Celebrating Women in STEM at CHOP

Persevere, persist, and prioritize. These are some of the powerful words of wisdom that women in science at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia would like to share with the next generation of female scientists. To celebrate Women’s History Month this year, we are continuing our tradition of highlighting the talented researchers at CHOP who work in the science, engineering, math, and technology (STEM) fields, which have historically been underrepresented by women. 

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Mar 6 2019

Patricia Brophy Chair Holds ‘Immeasurable’ Meaning for Yael Mossé, MD

By Jillian Rose Lim

Yael Mossé, MD, remembers meeting Patricia “Pat” Brophy, beloved nurse practitioner at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, nearly 23 years ago. Dr. Mossé was completing her pediatric residency, while Brophy was already a seasoned nurse caring for the sickest of children with cancer. Intrigued by the prospect of specializing in neuroblastoma, a cancer of the nervous system, Dr. Mossé reached out to Brophy to learn more about the disease that left children with limited treatment options. What began as a mentorship soon blossomed into a friendship spanning two memorable decades.

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Mar 4 2019

New Computational Method Sheds Light on How Genetic Variants Alter RNA Processing

By Sharlene George

A key moment occurs in any gripping novel that sets in motion the characters’ doom or fortune. In the context of gene regulation, RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play a similar pivotal role determining ribonucleic acid molecules’ (RNAs’) fate by guiding post-transcriptional events. This process is essential to interpretation of genetic code and its function in protein synthesis, which are the building blocks of any organism.

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Mar 1 2019

Uncovering the Unexpected: Q&A With Jean-Bernard Lubin, PhD, New Diversity Fellow

It’s been an exciting week on Cornerstone, as we’ve gotten to know the newest recipients of the Postdoctoral Fellowship for Academic Diversity and learn about the richness of experience they bring to our research community.

Closing our three-part Q&A series is Jean-Bernard Lubin, PhD, who discovered the perfect place to pursue his research interests in the microbiome and its effects throughout the lifespan. With the goal of directing the course of those effects with therapeutic interventions, Dr. Lubin brings his passion for bacterial genetics to CHOP.

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Feb 27 2019

Stronger Communities Through Research: Q&A With Phylicia Fitzpatrick Fleming, PhD, New Diversity Fellow

As part of a three-part Q&A series on Cornerstone, we’re introducing new members of the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia research community. The Postdoctoral Fellowship for Academic Diversity supports our belief that innovation is enhanced when a diverse group of researchers from a variety of backgrounds, disciplines, and perspectives contribute to solutions.  In this series, we’re learning more about our newest Diversity Fellows through their own voices, taking us on a journey from where their research paths began to their favorite pastimes.

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Feb 25 2019

Merging Mechanics and Human Movement: Q&A With Ozell Sanders, PhD, New Diversity Fellow

Breakthroughs occur when great minds from a variety of backgrounds join together in the spirit of innovation. At Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, we see diversity as a key driver of achievement and crucial when the accomplishments at stake have the potential to change, and even save, children’s lives. Among the ways CHOP demonstrates its commitment to diversity in research is the Postdoctoral Fellowship for Academic Diversity. Three new diversity fellows recently joined the CHOP research community, bringing the wealth of their unique education, training, and life experiences. In a three-part Q&A series, we’ll learn more about these scholars, their areas of expertise and interest, and even a little bit about how they spend their hard-earned downtime.

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Feb 22 2019

In the News: Sleep Problems and Autism, Opioid Overprescription, Food Pharmacy, Gun Violence Prevention, Proof-of-Concept Award, and Lung Cells in Fetal Development

By Nancy McCann

We start this edition of In the News with a look at the prevalence of sleep problems in young children with autism spectrum disorder, a study on opioid prescriptions for kids with broken elbows, and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia’s grand opening of the Healthy Weight Food Pharmacy and the research behind it.

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Feb 20 2019

Can Cutting-Edge Imaging Help to Map Microstructure of Infants’ Brains?

By Sharlene George

The findings:

While parents busily prepare for the arrival of their newborn in the final stages of pregnancy, life in the womb also is full of activity. The cerebral cortex in the third trimester is maturing rapidly, establishing the complex neuronal connections needed to navigate a wondrous world. Researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia suggest a new noninvasive method based on diffusion kurtosis metrics could be used to map how the microstructure of brain regions develop during early infancy. This 4-D spatiotemporal cytoarchitectural signature could provide effective imaging markers to help scientists better understand typical and atypical brain development and the emergence of certain brain functions.

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