May 1 2018

Does an Impaired Biological Pathway Help Explain Heart Problems in Huntington’s Disease?

The Findings:

Researchers gained new insights into the heart problems that are the second leading cause of death in patients with Huntington’s disease (HD). An incurable, inherited disease with progressive loss of brain cells and motor function, HD occurs when a defective gene produces repeated copies of a protein called huntingtin, or HTT. The mutant HTT (mHTT) protein disrupts multiple fundamental cellular processes along the mTORC1 pathway that promotes cell growth and metabolism. The study team described how decreased mTORC1 activity contributed to the development of heart disease with stress in mouse models of HD. By restoring cardiac mTORC1 activity, the researchers improved the animals’ heart function and survival over the course of the study.

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Apr 27 2018

“Unique, Different, and Special”: Ben Hartranft Speaks Up for Autism

Nineteen-year-old Ben Hartranft remembers the first research study he participated in at the Center for Autism Research (CAR) nearly eight years ago. Though he was just 12, he didn’t feel nervous or scared about the functional magnetic resonance imaging machine that would capture images of his brain. Instead, Ben’s mom recalls him joking that the researchers could duct tape his legs to the chair to help him keep still (which, of course, wasn’t necessary).

“I just stayed still, and it was very fun,” Ben said.

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Apr 24 2018

Life After Childhood Cancer: Q&A With Matthew Hocking, PhD

After surviving cancer, getting back into the rhythms of childhood or adolescence can be a challenge. From school, to a social life, to settling into independence, the impact of cancer often lingers beyond just the period of treatment, and it affects both the body and the brain.

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Apr 20 2018

Emily Whitehead Anniversary, Buchanan Lectureship, Hyundai Young Investigators, Yi Xing, New York Auto Show

Cars, computational biology, and cancer advances are all featured in this week’s roundup of Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia research news, as our investigators received recognition at places as far as the New York International Auto Show, and as close as our hospital’s own Seacrest Studios. Read on to learn more about new awards from Hyundai’s nonprofit organization, Hope on Wheels, the Emily Whitehead Foundation’s generous gift to our Cancer Immunotherapy Frontier Program, and more!

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Apr 18 2018

Center for Autism Research a Proving Ground for Novel Approaches

Editor’s Note: Each year, 10,000 patients diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) visit a wide range of clinical programs at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia — including developmental pediatrics, child and adolescent psychiatry, neurology, psychology, speech and language therapy, clinical genetics, general pediatrics, and more. With this enormous patient base and broad sets of expertise across specialties, the Center for Autism Research (CAR) at CHOP offers a tremendous opportunity to conduct rigorous research with its ultimate aim being to improve care, quality of life and long-term outcomes for individuals with ASD.

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Apr 16 2018

Researchers Target Brain Circuity as Driver of Antidepressant Behavior

Neurobiology researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia are looking deep into the brain’s circuitry to search for new avenues for the treatment of major depressive disorder, the most common mental illness.

In 2016, 10.3 million adults had at least one major depressive episode with severe impairment, according to the National Institute of Mental Health. While care by a health professional and antidepressant medication may be effective for some people, current treatments have a high rate of relapse and side effects.

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Apr 13 2018

Entrepreneurial Science Scholars Turn Ideas Into Medical Innovation

By definition, entrepreneurs are energetic leaders who challenge existing ideas to drive impactful change. Entrepreneurs think outside the box, follow their passion, and stay resilient and resourceful to achieve their goals. At Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, fellows in the Entrepreneurial Science Scholars Program do all of these things — and more — to improve the health of children and families.

On Feb. 22, we celebrated this year’s CHOP Entrepreneurial Science Scholars, a group of six clinician-researchers who are conducting pioneering research and innovation in diverse and critical fields. The CHOP Entrepreneurial Science Scholars Program aims to produce highly trained investigators skilled in translational research and the generation of creative solutions to biomedical problems. Joseph St. Geme, MD, Physician-in-Chief and Chairman of the Department of Pediatrics at CHOP, hosted the event.

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Apr 11 2018

A Poet and a Pediatrician: Meet Amy Goldstein, MD

Editor’s Note: In our Meet Our Investigators series on Cornerstone, get to know our remarkable researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute: a colorful collection of profiles that bring out the personality and passion of faculty members who have recently joined the Research Institute.

Name:

Amy Goldstein, MD

Title:

Clinical Director, Mitochondrial Medicine Frontier Program and associate professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Human Genetics at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine

Joined the Research Institute:

July 2017

Hometown:

Cherry Hill, N.J.

Favorite Book or Movie:

“Pride & Prejudice”

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Apr 6 2018

U.S. News & World Report, David Barrett, Driving & ADHD, Bike Safety, Concussion Research

Outdoor sports, biking, and bustling streets might be welcome signs of warmer weather and longer days, but they’re also research topics studied rigorously by investigators at our Center for Injury Research and Prevention (CIRP) in their quest to ensure safer environments for children and families. In this week’s roundup of Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia research headlines, learn about a new study from CIRP into the various causes and mechanisms of youth concussions beyond contact sports, discover cool technology that allows scientists to study how cyclists move and make decisions on urban streets, and find out how the CIRP driving simulator is helping to advance what we know of teen driving behaviors. On top of that, we congratulate the Cancer Center’s Dr. David Barrett on a new award from Stand Up to Cancer and offer big congratulations to our Department of Pediatrics’ continued success!

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Apr 3 2018

CHOP Ranked Nation's Top Pediatrics Department for 2019

With enormous pride and admiration, we are thrilled to share the news that for the sixth year in a row, U.S. News & World Report has ranked the Department of Pediatrics at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania first place in pediatric medical education — a top spot shared with Harvard University this year. Once again, the high honor illustrates the excellent commitments our faculty make every day in training physicians and researchers for a future filled with breakthroughs. Congratulations to our amazing Pediatrics Department!

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