Category Archive: Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute

Oct 4 2019

In The News: Screening Tool for Autism, Recognition of ECMO Center Manager, Generous Gift for Palliative Care, Research Leadership Position, Non-verbal Children with Autism

By Nancy McCann

Take a look at who’s been making research headlines lately. This week we’re covering the accuracy of an autism spectrum disorder screening tool; the generous gift for palliative care, treatment, and research; and the international recognition of our Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) Center manager, James Connelly.

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Oct 2 2019

Off Campus: An EMT-on-Skis Comes to the Rescue

By Nancy McCann

Editor’s note: Welcome to our new blog series, “Off Campus.” Here you’ll discover what our amazing Research Institute employees do for fun, recreation, and the good of their communities once they leave the city behind. And if you know someone in your department or lab with a fascinating hobby or interest, we’d like to hear about it!

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Sep 30 2019

Balancing the Bench and the Bedside: Q&A With Jay Storm, MD

During Childhood Cancer Awareness Month and year-round, we love to see our patient families invested in our cancer research at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia – whether it’s by attending events like the  Parkway Run & Walk or just sheer curiosity about the projects our scientists have in the works.

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Sep 27 2019

Don’t Go It Alone: The Successful Mentor-Mentee Relationship

Michael Marks, PhD, and Jing Karchin, PhD, were among three mentor-mentee pairs who participated in a panel discussion during the weeklong celebration of National Postdoc Appreciation Week.

By Barbara Drosey

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Sep 20 2019

In the News: Pre-transplant Communication, Working Memory and Driving, Master Regulator Gene in Schizophrenia, Girls’ Concussion Care, Baby Brain Development

A slight chill on the air and the rustling of falling leaves means it’s time to grab your favorite pumpkin spice beverage and read our latest roundup of research news. Investigators from Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia’s Center for Injury Prevention and Research shared findings in concussion research and preventing car crashes among teens. Scientists in the Raymond G. Perelman Center for Cellular and Molecular Therapeutics discovered a gene that could help guide future treatment for schizophrenia, and a pilot grant from the Center for Pediatric Clinical Effectiveness will support aims to improve pre-transplant communication with patients and their families. As you savor the last few sips from your cup, learn about CHOP researchers’ contributions to a special journal issue on baby brain development. 

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Sep 19 2019

Where Are They Now? Former Postdocs Talk Life After CHOP

Life after leaving research training is an open road for postdoctoral fellows full of potential career opportunities. Some involve innovative research in academia and industry, and others include exciting new responsibilities in non-research positions. At Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute, our postdocs go on to become teaching-focused faculty, consultants, principal investigators, journal editors, and in some cases, all of the above. 

To celebrate the 10th anniversary of National Postdoc Appreciation Week — and to guide current and future postdocs who might have a big question mark when it comes to their career paths — we connected with four former postdoctoral fellows who utilize the unique experience they gained at CHOP in a variety of different roles. Scroll down for some words of wisdom and inspiration from our postdoctoral alumni!

 

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Sep 17 2019

Off Campus: ‘Down East’ Fun for the Whole Family

By Nancy McCann

Editor’s note: Welcome to our new blog series, “Off Campus.” Here you’ll discover what our amazing Research Institute employees do for fun, recreation, and the good of their communities once they leave the city behind. And if you know someone in your department or lab with a fascinating hobby or interest, we’d like to hear about it!

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Aug 30 2019

Off Campus: Out of the Lab and Into the Kitchen

By Barbara Drosey

Editor’s note: Welcome to our new blog series! “Off Campus” is where you’ll discover what our amazing Research Institute employees do for fun, recreation, and the good of their communities once they leave the city behind. And if you know someone in your department or lab with a fascinating hobby or interest, we’d like to hear about it!

As director of the Congenital Hyperinsulinism Center at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Diva De León-Crutchlow, MD, MSCE, leads a combined clinical and research program aimed to treat patients with hyperinsulinism through medical management or surgical intervention.

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Aug 23 2019

In The News: ‘The Birds and the Bees,’ Ultrasound-guided IV Line Placement, First CHOPS Syndrome Symposium, Social Media-based Parenting Program, Bystander CPR

Take a look at who’s been in the press lately. This week we’re covering physician-endorsed parent-teen talks, the high rate of success with ultrasound-guided intravenous line placement, and how moms with postpartum depression are being helped with a social media-based parenting program.

Physician Endorsed ‘Birds and the Bees’ Parent-teen Talk may Prove Effective 

New research shows that brief parent-targeted interventions in the primary care setting can increase communication between parents and their teens about sexual and alcohol behavior. This method may serve as an important strategy for parents to influence adolescent behaviors and health outcomes.

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Aug 13 2019

How Do Specific Sets of Neurons Influence Autistic-like Features of CDKL5 Deficiency Disorder?

The findings:

Researchers studying CDKL5 deficiency disorder (CDD), a complex and severe neurodevelopmental condition caused by mutations in the CDKL5 gene, gained novel insights into CDD’s underlying mechanisms. Their findings suggest that disrupted early development of neural circuitry has downstream consequences, disturbing neurotransmitter pathways and resulting in cognitive problems and autistic-like behaviors.

Previous research by the scientific team demonstrated that loss of CDKL5, which provides instructions for making a synaptic protein essential for normal brain development and functions, in forebrain glutamatergic neurons is implicated in learning and memory deficits. Their new findings suggest that loss of CDKL5 in forebrain GABAergic neurons leads to autistic-like features in mouse models of CDD.

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