Category Archive: Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute

Apr 19 2019

In the News: PAS 2019, NFL Helmet Safety, American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy, Bypass Prophylaxis Hemophilia, Lung Disease In Utero

Whether they study helmets on the football field or hemophilia in a lab, our scientists at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute are always on the cutting-edge of their respective fields, as the latest roundup of research news shows. This week, read about what to expect at next week’s Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting, discover how a CHOP engineer is helping to make the NFL safer, and learn about new results from our Center for Fetal Research about treating lung diseases in utero.

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Apr 17 2019

On the Road to Better Treatments for Obese Asthmatics

By Nancy McCann

Ten year-old Jack looks longingly out his living room window, yearning to play kickball with his friends. But mom doesn’t want his asthma to flare up, which it tends to do when he runs around. As much as he wants to go outside, he won’t, because he knows how uncomfortable he gets when his chest starts to tighten. Instead, Jack spends hours on the couch in front of the television, playing video games.

This reinforcing cycle keeps churning — exercise and outdoor play are great for combatting Jack’s obesity, but they’re bad for his asthma. Sitting around begets more weight troubles, but it doesn’t cause him breathing discomfort. Around and around it goes.

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Apr 11 2019

2019 Distinguished Research Trainees Show Character and Creativity

Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute recognizes the unique and remarkable trainees who have been nominated by their mentors across CHOP through the Distinguished Research Trainee Awards. This year, the Research Trainee Advisory Committee selected four scientists across different disciplines and divisions who are positioned to drive bigger breakthroughs in their fields. Learn more about these researchers’ achievements and accolades: 

Sarah Sheppard, MD, PhD, Pediatrics/Medical Genetics Resident

Mentor: Elizabeth Bhoj, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor of Genetics and Pediatrics

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Apr 5 2019

In the News: Genes Causing Osteoporosis, Residents’ Longer Work Shifts, Pediatric Spinal Deformity, Ventilation Strategy for Preterm Infants, Pediatric Cell Atlas

As spring slowly arrives here in Philadelphia, take a deep breath of fresh air and catch up on our research that’s been making publishing news. This week we’re covering genes that cause osteoporosis, the effects of longer work shifts for first-year residents, and the project to map every cell in a child’s body. You’ll also learn about respiratory support in preterm infants and research results that Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia investigators published in the Public Library of Science (PLOS) One.

Risk Genes for Osteoporosis May Lead to Future Treatments

Scientists have harnessed powerful data analysis tools and three-dimensional studies of genomic geography to implicate new risk genes for osteoporosis, the chronic bone-weakening condition that affects millions of people. Knowing the causative genes may later open the door to more effective treatments.

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Mar 26 2019

How Does a New Computational Method Transform Public Big Data Into Knowledge of Transcript Splicing?

By Sharlene George

The findings:

A new computational framework called deep-learning augmented RNA-seq analysis of transcript splicing (DARTS) uses deep-learning based predictions to add dimension to the wealth of information available in public RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) big data sets. DARTS allows researchers to gain new insights into RNA and protein complexity, particularly for genes with low expression.

Who conducted the study:

A team from the Center for Computational and Genomic Medicine at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia conducted the study including Yi Xing, PhD, who is the Center’s director, and first authors Zijun Zhang and Zhicheng Pan, who are PhD students.

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Mar 22 2019

In the News: Mitochondrial Gene Variance, Killing Cancer Cells, NICU Stress Effects, Visually Impaired Driver Safety

In this week’s news roundup, there’s a lot to be proud of as our researchers make impactful discoveries, such as new-found variability in a mitochondrial disease-causing gene and encouraging findings about an antibody-drug conjugate that targets a surface protein expressed in childhood neuroblastomas, effectively killing cancer cells. Wanjiku Njoroge, MD, and colleagues followed mothers of very preterm infants to determine stress in the NICU and its effects five years later, and Allison Curry, PhD, MPH, is changing perceptions about visually impaired drivers.

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Mar 14 2019

CHOP Ranked Nation’s Top Pediatrics Department for 2020

For the seventh year in a row, U.S.News & World Report has ranked the Department of Pediatrics at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania as the number one pediatrics department in the United States. 

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Mar 11 2019

In the News: National Clinical Research Award, Vitamin D and Obesity, Modern Healthcare Women Leaders, Mitochondrial Disorder Drug, Predicting Sepsis

Last week marked International Women’s Day (March 8), and while we recognize the remarkable women in science and healthcare at the Research Institute every day of the year, it seems especially fitting that this news roundup features some of those role models as they receive accolades and awards. Hematology researcher, Lindsey George, MD, was honored for her breakthrough work in developing a gene therapy for hemophilia B, while our CEO and President, Madeline Bell, ranked on the Top 25 Women Leaders list by Modern Healthcare. Meanwhile, in other news, researchers published findings on obesity and vitamin D, the use of machine learning for early sepsis detection, and a promising drug to treat some mitochondrial disorders.

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Mar 8 2019

Intelligence Meets Inspiration: Celebrating Women in STEM at CHOP

Persevere, persist, and prioritize. These are some of the powerful words of wisdom that women in science at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia would like to share with the next generation of female scientists. To celebrate Women’s History Month this year, we are continuing our tradition of highlighting the talented researchers at CHOP who work in the science, engineering, math, and technology (STEM) fields, which have historically been underrepresented by women. 

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Mar 1 2019

Uncovering the Unexpected: Q&A With Jean-Bernard Lubin, PhD, New Diversity Fellow

It’s been an exciting week on Cornerstone, as we’ve gotten to know the newest recipients of the Postdoctoral Fellowship for Academic Diversity and learn about the richness of experience they bring to our research community.

Closing our three-part Q&A series is Jean-Bernard Lubin, PhD, who discovered the perfect place to pursue his research interests in the microbiome and its effects throughout the lifespan. With the goal of directing the course of those effects with therapeutic interventions, Dr. Lubin brings his passion for bacterial genetics to CHOP.

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