Category Archive: Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Mar 24 2016

Researchers Examine Obesity, Cardiovascular Risks in Down Syndrome

Down Syndrome Children with Down syndrome (also known as Trisomy 21) are prone to obesity. Their families may be concerned about their future risks for cardiovascular problems as well as their quality of life.

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Mar 22 2016

Staying Safe in the Sun: A Sun Protection Q&A

sun protectionAs the weather turns warm, children and adults of all ages naturally gravitate toward outdoor activities. Many dream of the start of beach season and lazy days basking in the sun. But protecting skin from the sun’s radiation is an important aspect of preventing cancer, and the sun-protective habits developed during childhood could have lifelong impacts.

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Mar 16 2016

CHOP’s Pediatrics Department Tops U.S. News & World Report 2017 Rankings

CHOP’s Pediatrics departmentWe are thrilled to announce that the Department of Pediatrics at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania was named the top pediatrics graduate program in the country by U.S. News & World Report.

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Mar 11 2016

CHOP Research In the News: Teen Crime, Tech Innovators, Tackling Concussions

CHOP Research In the NewsOur news highlights from this week cover some provocative topics in pediatric research, from serious teen violence in Philadelphia neighborhoods to head trauma injuries in student athletes across the country. Read on for details about the latest research developments and projects at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.

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Mar 9 2016

Coming in for a Landing: A Moonshot Initiative Q&A

moonshot_initiativeVice President Joe Biden’s ambitious “Moonshot” initiative is aimed at boosting and streamlining cancer research across the country. We asked Andrei Thomas-Tikhonenko, PhD, chief of the Division of Cancer Pathobiology and an investigator for the Center for Childhood Cancer Research at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, to share his thoughts on how this strategic plan is changing the landscape of pediatric cancer research.

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Mar 7 2016

In the Neighborhood: Environmental Features Associated With Teen Homicide

teen homicideIt is not a pretty picture. Boarded up, dilapidated buildings. Overgrown vacant lots filled with debris. Security bars on homes and businesses. A landscape of disorder surrounds many urban youth who are at higher risk of homicide. A new study took a close look at Philadelphia neighborhoods to determine if certain environmental features could be associated with youth violence.

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Feb 24 2016

Statewide Action Plan to Curb Overprescribing of Psychotropic Medications

Psychotropic MedicationsResearch conducted by PolicyLab at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia laid the groundwork for new statewide initiatives that aim to reduce the use of psychotropic medications among Pennsylvania children in the foster care system who are enrolled in Medicaid.

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Feb 23 2016

Research Does Not Stand Alone at Community-Driven Research Day

researchResearchers and representatives from community-based organizations arrived at Community-Driven Research Day looking for a perfect match who shared their interest in solving problems to create a better, healthier environment.

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Jan 20 2016

New Director of Pediatric Research in Office Settings Network

Alexander FiksAlexander Fiks, MD, MSCE, a primary care pediatrician at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, wears many hats, and he is adding one more with his recent appointment as director of the American Academy of Pediatrics’ Pediatric Research in Office Settings (PROS) network.

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Jan 19 2016

Teens’ Rising Risk of Kidney Stones: Four Things to Know

kidney stonesIn a marked increase, kidney stones, a painful condition that historically mainly affected middle-aged white men, are growing more common in the U.S. Perhaps surprisingly, that rise is particularly steep among adolescent, female, and African-American populations.

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