Category Archive: Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Aug 24 2018

In the News: For the Love of Grace Foundation, Hemophilia Research in the NYT, Microbiome Symposium, Baby Monitors, 2018 Parkway Run

Microbes, monitors, and miraculous medicine converge in this week’s roundup of research-related headlines at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Keep reading to learn more about new concerns for commercially available baby monitors reported by our researchers, one family’s inspirational story of resilience and recovery after their baby daughter battled a brain tumor, and exciting upcoming events in the CHOP community, including the fifth annual symposium for microbiome research.

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Apr 3 2018

CHOP Ranked Nation's Top Pediatrics Department for 2019

With enormous pride and admiration, we are thrilled to share the news that for the sixth year in a row, U.S. News & World Report has ranked the Department of Pediatrics at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania first place in pediatric medical education — a top spot shared with Harvard University this year. Once again, the high honor illustrates the excellent commitments our faculty make every day in training physicians and researchers for a future filled with breakthroughs. Congratulations to our amazing Pediatrics Department!

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Mar 21 2018

Lifespan Brain Institute Symposium Digs Into Roots of Mental Illness

Leaders of the Lifespan Brain Institute (LiBI) brought together experts in child and adult psychiatry, and basic and translational science, to delve into the origins of mental illness, during the Institute’s first symposium, “Pathological Antecedents to Neuropsychiatric Disorders.” Throughout the day, 200 attendees learned about how the typical trajectory of brain development and function is derailed in psychiatric disorders at various points throughout life — perhaps as early as in the womb.

LiBI is uniquely positioned as a broad collaboration between Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania that supports research across the fetal-adult continuum, which is a pillar of CHOP Research Institute’s strategic plan.

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Mar 15 2018

Four Women in Science: What Inspires Them to Make Breakthroughs

In the halls and history of Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and its Research Institute, you don’t have to search far to find role models who thrive in science fields that have been, historically, underrepresented by women.

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Mar 9 2018

Lung Stem Cells, 2021 Congress of the ISTH, Backseat Safety, Pan-Cancer Analysis, Gates Cambridge Scholarship

From the discovery of stem cells that multiply after a lung injury, to new data that advances how we think about (and treat) childhood cancer, our first roundup of March is packed with discovery. Read on to learn how our researchers stay at the forefront of pediatric science with a new study that expands what scientists know about the body’s extraordinary ability to regenerate, a pan-cancer project that distinguishes how cancer develops in children versus adults, and a handful of updates on what our investigators have in store for the near future.

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Mar 2 2018

Exploring the Wide World of the Microbiome

Studying the microbiome — the 40 trillion or so invisible microbes that call your body home — is like being an explorer of a secret world with its own language and lifeforms. Whether these microbes are sometimes friends or sometimes foe depends on subtle interactions with each other and the role of influential factors such as your genetics, environment, age, and diet.

The PennCHOP Microbiome Program awards annual pilot and feasibility grants to help faculty members of the University of Pennsylvania and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia scientific communities navigate this uncharted territory. With the funding awarded in 2017, eight projects are underway, and CHOP clinician-scientists are leading two of them.

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Feb 26 2018

John Maris, MD, Receives National Cancer Institute Outstanding Investigator Award

Long before he entered medical school, John M. Maris, MD, pediatric oncologist and the recent recipient of the National Cancer Institute’s Outstanding Investigator Award, became captivated by the mysteries of neuroblastoma. A cancer of the peripheral (not brain) nervous system, neuroblastoma accounts for 7 percent of all childhood cancers and 15 percent of all childhood cancer deaths.

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Jan 11 2018

Is Autism Associated With Stronger or Weaker Brain Connections?

The Finding:

In a new study that sheds light on a longstanding paradox in autism research, investigators showed how children and teens with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can have both stronger and weaker brain connections than their typically developing peers. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) revealed that while individuals with ASD have weaker brain connections compared to their peers overall (a measure known as absolute connectivity), they simultaneously exhibited stronger connections within the brain networks implicated in attention and social cognition compared to their other networks (a measure known as relative connectivity). Additionally, the more these brain connections differed from typical development, the more severe the child’s ASD symptoms seemed to be.

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Dec 21 2017

Groundbreaking Gene Therapy Approved for Inherited Retinal Blindness

More than a decade of studies led by researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania culminated this week with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s approval of an innovative one-time gene therapy product indicated for the treatment of patients with a rare, inherited form of retinal blindness.

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Nov 13 2017

Strengthening Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Research: Antonio Rosato

From the time Antonio Rosato was diagnosed with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) at age 4½, his family was eager for him to participate in a clinical research trial. They wanted to give him access to the latest advances in pharmacological and disease management approaches for DMD, an opportunity that Antonio’s uncle Artie, who was diagnosed with the same neuromuscular disease four decades ago, did not have.

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