Category Archive: Center for Fetal Diagnosis and Treatment

Jan 12 2018

Birth Defects Awareness, Million Dollar Bike Ride Grant, WAO Center of Excellence, Alopecia and Thyroid Screening, New PolicyLab Video

The new year brings brand-new opportunities to advance pediatric research at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute, and if the first two weeks of 2018 are any indication, our investigators are off to a remarkable start. With January marking National Birth Defects Prevention Month, the Center for Fetal Diagnosis and Treatment at CHOP embarked on a campaign to raise awareness for birth defect treatments and research. Meanwhile, our friends at PolicyLab released an exciting video communicating their passionate mission to improve the well-being of children and families. This week, we also cover new pathways to discovery for conditions both rare and common, from hyperinsulinism to alopecia. If (like us), your new year’s resolution is to stay up to date with the latest CHOP research headlines, you’re in the right place!

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Nov 11 2016

CHOP Research In the News: Vaccine Safety, Emotions and Driving, Concussion Discussions, Surgical Excellence Award

CHOP Research In the NewsIt has been a whirlwind week for most Americans, so if you need to break away from political news to catch up with your science news, you’ve come to the right place.

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Sep 30 2016

CHOP Research In the News: New Era of Genetics, Grant Awards, Texting Cancer Survivors, Baby Teeth and Autism

CHOP Research NewsA new month is about to begin, so it seems fitting that this week’s research highlights have lots of “new” initiatives that we’re excited to report.

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Sep 23 2016

CHOP Research In the News: Emmy Award, Kids and the Cancer Moonshot, Precision Approach to Epilepsy, Concussion Monitoring App

CHOP Research In the NewsThis week we’re all about getting smart in our highlights of research news from The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Getting smart in the approach to tackling childhood cancer means identifying strategies that will make a decade’s progress in half the time.

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Mar 15 2016

Pennsylvania Bio Patient Impact Award Goes to Fetal Surgery Pioneer

patient impact awardHats off to N. Scott Adzick, MD, surgeon-in-chief and the founder and director of the Center for Fetal Diagnosis and Treatment at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, on receiving Pennsylvania Bio’s Patient Impact Award at the organization’s annual dinner March 11.

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Jan 29 2016

CHOP Research In the News: Fetal Imaging, Hoverboards, and Violence

CHOP Research In the NewsViolence against children has reached an epidemic level globally, according to a new study published in the journal Pediatrics and reported by CBS News.

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Nov 27 2015

Five Fascinating Facets of Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome

Beckwith-Wiedemann SyndromeBeckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome (BWS) is a condition that occurs when parts of the body grow too large, too fast.

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Sep 29 2015

MOMS Study Suggests Candidates, Timing for Fetal Spina Bifida Surgery

Fetal spina bifida surgery to repair myelomeningocele is a remarkable and intricate procedure performed before birth. If untreated, spinal cord damage from amniotic fluid exposure is progressive during gestation.

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Mar 31 2015

Driven by Patients: CHOP’s Cutting-Edge Fetal Surgery to be Featured on PBS

fetal surgeryThe work of The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia’s N. Scott Adzick, MD, an internationally recognized fetal surgery pioneer, will be featured in the new documentary series Twice Born.

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Jan 30 2015

Bridging the Gap Between Womb and World

preterm babiesInvestigators at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia are on the cusp of an innovative approach to caring for preterm babies, one that could radically transform the way they are treated and significantly improve their outcomes.

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