Category Archive: Center for Autism Research

Apr 24 2018

Life After Childhood Cancer: Q&A With Matthew Hocking, PhD

After surviving cancer, getting back into the rhythms of childhood or adolescence can be a challenge. From school, to a social life, to settling into independence, the impact of cancer often lingers beyond just the period of treatment, and it affects both the body and the brain.

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Apr 18 2018

Center for Autism Research a Proving Ground for Novel Approaches

Editor’s Note: Each year, 10,000 patients diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) visit a wide range of clinical programs at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia — including developmental pediatrics, child and adolescent psychiatry, neurology, psychology, speech and language therapy, clinical genetics, general pediatrics, and more. With this enormous patient base and broad sets of expertise across specialties, the Center for Autism Research (CAR) at CHOP offers a tremendous opportunity to conduct rigorous research with its ultimate aim being to improve care, quality of life and long-term outcomes for individuals with ASD.

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Mar 15 2018

Four Women in Science: What Inspires Them to Make Breakthroughs

In the halls and history of Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and its Research Institute, you don’t have to search far to find role models who thrive in science fields that have been, historically, underrepresented by women.

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Mar 9 2018

Lung Stem Cells, 2021 Congress of the ISTH, Backseat Safety, Pan-Cancer Analysis, Gates Cambridge Scholarship

From the discovery of stem cells that multiply after a lung injury, to new data that advances how we think about (and treat) childhood cancer, our first roundup of March is packed with discovery. Read on to learn how our researchers stay at the forefront of pediatric science with a new study that expands what scientists know about the body’s extraordinary ability to regenerate, a pan-cancer project that distinguishes how cancer develops in children versus adults, and a handful of updates on what our investigators have in store for the near future.

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Feb 1 2018

Join Our Team to Tackle Autism Spectrum Disorder Research

With the entire city soaring from the Eagles Championship win, we can feel even better that our home team also has a heart for research. So take your Eagles fandom to the next level by joining your colleagues, patients, friends, and family on Team CHOP Research in the Eagles Autism Challenge. Not only will you help fund breakthroughs made right here at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia for the thousands of children and families who are affected by autism, but you will have the opportunity to celebrate on the field with the NFC Champions themselves!

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Jan 26 2018

Quantifying Concussions, Vitamins for Mitochondrial Disease, Autism and Police Encounters, Using Smartphones, Doug Wallace

Smartphones, sports injury, and stories about science: This week in our Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia research roundup, 2018 is in full swing as our investigators made media headlines for their work to advance children’s health. Keep reading to learn about the different ways researchers at CHOP study the benefits and drawbacks of teens’ smartphone use, why research led by concussion experts at our Center for Injury Research and Prevention (CIRP) was featured in a recent philly.com article, and how experts in the Mitochondrial Medicine Frontier Program are weighing in on vitamins and supplements for mitochondrial disease.

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Jan 11 2018

Is Autism Associated With Stronger or Weaker Brain Connections?

The Finding:

In a new study that sheds light on a longstanding paradox in autism research, investigators showed how children and teens with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can have both stronger and weaker brain connections than their typically developing peers. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) revealed that while individuals with ASD have weaker brain connections compared to their peers overall (a measure known as absolute connectivity), they simultaneously exhibited stronger connections within the brain networks implicated in attention and social cognition compared to their other networks (a measure known as relative connectivity). Additionally, the more these brain connections differed from typical development, the more severe the child’s ASD symptoms seemed to be.

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Jan 5 2018

Researchers Take Gaming to a New Level to Help Children With Autism

Each new year comes with anticipation for the latest and greatest in the world of video games to be revealed. Which sequels will surpass their originals? Will beloved characters be reinvented? And we want to know: What brand-new entries are lined up that could offer an amazing experience in field of gaming for health?

The Center for Autism Research (CAR) at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia has several studies in the works that are looking at the feasibility of using video games and virtual reality to help children improve symptoms of autism. With engaging platforms and cutting-edge graphics, these games are aiming for a “high score” as easy-to-access, affordable, and effective interventions for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Here’s a quick glance at what is on the horizon:

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Dec 27 2017

Our Most Read Stories of 2017 Bring Back the Wonder of Childhood

It was a big year for children’s health: We celebrated the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s approval of the world’s first chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cell therapy this September, followed closely by approval of the very first gene therapy to treat inherited blindness this month — both of which have their roots at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania. But besides the big headline-making breakthroughs (brilliant as they are), we wanted to know what other stories captivated our readers in 2017.

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Oct 13 2017

Translational Research Workshop Bridges Gap Between Bench Research and Clinic

If you glance at a diagram of the continuum of translational research, the arrows point orderly to five phases — from basic research to improving population health. Rarely, however, is the business of discovery so neatly aligned. It takes unexpected twists and turns, as attendees at this week’s Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Translational Research Workshop for Basic Scientists heard from experienced investigators who shared lessons that they’ve learned while pursuing their scientific endeavors.

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