September 2019

Monthly Archive: September 2019

Sep 17 2019

Off Campus: ‘Down East’ Fun for the Whole Family

By Nancy McCann

Editor’s note: Welcome to our new blog series, “Off Campus.” Here you’ll discover what our amazing Research Institute employees do for fun, recreation, and the good of their communities once they leave the city behind. And if you know someone in your department or lab with a fascinating hobby or interest, we’d like to hear about it!

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Sep 12 2019

Training the Brain to Think Flexibly in Adolescent Anorexia

By Jillian Rose Lim

Whether it’s a road closure on the morning commute or new responsibilities at work, we’re constantly faced with opportunities to use our cognitive flexibility, the ability to shift gears and think up new solutions. But for those who struggle with serious conditions such as eating disorders or depression, improving this executive function could have a major impact on treatment outcomes.

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Sep 6 2019

In the News: Cancer Drug Approval, Chief of Infectious Diseases, Genetics and Obesity, Police Encounters and Autism, Rare Disease Q&A, Stress Resilience

It’s time to say goodbye to summer and settle into days with a little more structure (and a little less humidity). It’s also Childhood Cancer Awareness month, a special time to raise awareness for pediatric cancer research and recognize the researchers who work toward discovering causes and developing treatments. In this week’s research news roundup, learn how scientists in our Cancer Center contributed to the approval of a new cancer drug to treat solid and brain tumors, join us in welcoming our new Chief of Infectious Diseases, learn about new discoveries into stress resilience, and more.

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Sep 3 2019

Finding Answers: How Genetic Counselors Improve Families’ Lives With Science and Compassion

Editor’s Note: Genetic counselors interpret genetic test results to guide and support patients seeking information about their personal and family health. They can take a variety of roles, from meeting with patients in a hospital or clinical care setting, to working in a diagnostic laboratory, to performing primary research. In this guest blog, Sarah Raible, MS, CGC, a senior genetic counselor and clinical director of the Center for Cornelia de Lange Syndrome and Related Diagnoses Center within the Roberts Individualized Medical Genetics Center (RIMGC) at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, discusses how genetic counselors’ unique contributions and insights are helping to shape the future of precision medicine.

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