May 2019

Monthly Archive: May 2019

May 3 2019

Where Discovery Leads: Capturing the Complexity of Autism

By Jillian Rose Lim, Nancy McCann, Barbara Drosey, and Sharlene George

Editor’s Note: Where Discovery Leads is a multimedia storytelling project that delves into key research themes at CHOP Research Institute. This is part one of a three-part series that focuses on novel diagnostic tools and approaches being developed under the leadership of the Center for Autism Research at CHOP. See part 2 and part 3 of the series.

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May 3 2019

Where Discovery Leads: New Phone App for Name Recognition to Aid Autism Screening

By Nancy McCann

Editor’s Note: Where Discovery Leads is a multimedia storytelling project that delves into key research themes at CHOP Research Institute. This is part two of a three-part series that focuses on novel diagnostic tools and approaches being developed under the leadership of the Center for Autism Research at CHOP. See part 1 and part 3 of this series.

A child’s diminished response to hearing his or her name has long been recognized as a red flag for autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and now researchers have developed a phone app to quantitatively measure this behavior as a way to help screen for this complex neurodevelopmental diagnosis.

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May 3 2019

Where Discovery Leads: Expanding Access to Diagnosis With ECHO Autism

By Barbara Drosey

Editor’s Note: Where Discovery Leads is a multimedia storytelling project that delves into key research themes at CHOP Research Institute. This is part three of a three-part series that focuses on novel diagnostic tools and approaches being developed under the leadership of the Center for Autism Research at CHOP. See part 1 and part 2 of this series.

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May 1 2019

Can Boosting an Oncogene Make Cancer Cells More Vulnerable to Chemotherapy?

By Sharlene George

The Findings:

Oncogenes such as MYC are notorious troublemakers that promote cancer. Previous research strategies have focused on finding ways to quiet down levels of MYC; however, basic scientists at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia took the opposite approach. In preclinical models, they increased MYC activity in combination with conventional chemotherapy for Burkitt lymphoma to boost an anti-cancer response. The tumor cells became more sensitive to the drugs, and cancer cell death increased.

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