October 2018

Monthly Archive: October 2018

Oct 26 2018

On its Tenth Birthday, PolicyLab Gathers Champions for Children

PolicyLab hosted a 10th anniversary celebration Oct. 22 that its attendees won’t forget. After more than a decade of working to inform policies impacting children’s health, the Center of Emphasis at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia gathered regional and national leaders alongside clinicians, academics, and community collaborators at the National Museum of American Jewish History in Philadelphia to discuss the future of children’s health policy and practice.

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Oct 23 2018

Data Release to Enable Smarter Trials for Pediatric Cancer: Q&A With John Maris, MD

With the release of over 200 genomic tumor models spanning 25 different types of childhood cancer, researchers may now have the ability to skip lengthy preclinical work in their development of novel treatments. With funding from Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation (ALSF), the Pediatric Preclinical Testing Consortium (PPTC) announced their data sets will now be made available to any qualified academic petitioner — a move that John Maris, MD, oncologist at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Cancer Center and principal investigator of the PPTC’s CHOP site, believes is the first of its kind.

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Oct 19 2018

In the News: Sepsis in Scientific American, Updating Genetic Tests, Prenatal Gene Editing, Nature Magazine, Type 1.5 Diabetes

Our breakthrough research at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute made headlines in both popular science media outlets and prominent scientific journals alike, from advances in detecting sepsis, to pioneering work in prenatal gene editing, to the future of genomic medicine. Read on to learn more about how our scientists stay at the cutting-edge of their fields by approaching pediatric medicine inventively, whether it’s by developing the most effective alerts in emergency medicine, modernizing genetic testing models to keep up with an accelerating pace of discovery, and beyond. 

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Oct 18 2018

Four Investigators Awarded Childhood Cancer Research Grants From St. Baldrick’s

Four scientists from Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia’s Cancer Center received grants from the St. Baldrick’s Foundation to conduct research projects to improve outcomes for children with cancer.

The top private funder of childhood cancer research grants in the U.S., St. Baldrick’s awarded researchers and institutions around the nation a total of $19.1 million this year in what the charitable organization called “its biggest grant cycle of 2018.” In all, St. Baldrick’s has funded more than $253 million in childhood cancer research grants since 2005.

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Oct 16 2018

Steven D. Douglas, MD, Receives 25th Silver Lecture for Pediatric HIV/AIDS Research


With an enterprising career spanning 50 years in basic and clinical immunology and more than 500 publications, Steven D. Douglas, MD, had the honor of presenting the 25th Herman and Gertrude Silver Lecture, in which he reviewed major milestones in the field of pediatric HIV/AIDS and shared his optimism that paradigm shifts and new discoveries are ahead.

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Oct 11 2018

Ignacio Tapia, MD, Receives ATS Award Named in Honor of Late CHOP Researcher

Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia’s Ignacio Tapia, MD, received the inaugural Carole L. Marcus Outstanding Achievement Award from the American Thoracic Society (ATS), named in honor of his CHOP colleague who was a leader in pediatric sleep medicine research.

“It was a great honor to receive this award named after my mentor,” Dr. Tapia said. “I am working hard every day to live up to the expectations.”

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Oct 8 2018

The Science Behind Gene Therapy: Creating Breakthroughs One Gene at a Time

For more than 20 years, researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania have been at the forefront of taking a system perfected by nature — a virus — and transforming it into breakthrough gene therapies for rare single-gene diseases. CHOP was the first pediatric research institution to develop chimeric antigen receptor T cell (CAR-T) therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In this approach, viral vectors are used to modify a patient’s own T cells, training them to track down and eliminate the circulating cancer cells.

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Oct 5 2018

In the News: Silver Award, Supporting Outcomes Research, Hope on Wheels, Home Visiting Programs

As we move full-speed ahead into fall, the new season brings with it a handful of headlines from our researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. This week, we share the latest news about investigators who have been recognized for their research legacies and for their current cutting-edge work, from discoveries in the basic and clinical science of HIV/AIDS, to the development of learning health system-based training in outcomes research, to the design of innovative approaches to childhood cancer.

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Oct 3 2018

Bone and Mineral Research Award Celebrates Career of Michael A. Levine, MD


For Michael A. Levine, MD, a pediatric endocrinologist, scientist, and fixture in the bone and mineral research community for nearly four decades, few things are a greater source of pride than to be honored by one’s own peers. The medical director of the Center for Bone Health at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and chief emeritus of the hospital’s Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes, was recognized Sept. 29 by the American Society of Bone and Mineral Research (ASBMR) — an organization he describes fondly as his “home society” — with the 2018 Frederic C. Bartter Award.

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Oct 1 2018

What are Best Practices for Pediatric Nasogastric Tube Placement and Verification?

The findings:

Researchers have published best practice recommendations for nasogastric (NG) tube location placement and verification in pediatric patients. Endorsed by the American Society for Parental and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN), the recommendations include: provide education; use appropriate NGT placement and securing methods; measure gastric pH; consider a radiograph for any patient in whom there is a concern for correct NGT placement; and improve interpretation and communication about the radiograph.

Why it matters:

Upto this point, no standard for the NG tube insertion procedure existed in the United States. If performed improperly, the common practice has potentially serious or fatal complications, including tubes being placed in the child’s lung or snaking into the brain. In addition, the tube can be inserted into the small intestine rather than the intended target of the stomach.

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