August 2017

Monthly Archive: August 2017

Aug 31 2017

A Moment to Remember: First-of-its-Kind Cancer Treatment Approved by FDA

It was a pivotal moment that has turned into a new era for cancer immunotherapy. On April 17, 2012, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia researchers for the first time treated a pediatric patient with a cellular therapy that used her own reprogrammed immune cells, called T cells, to attack her aggressive form of blood cancer.

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Aug 29 2017

CHOP Scientists Advance Hemophilia Research With Bayer Awards

For children with hemophilia, every new research advance is a step toward a life filled with more activity, freedom, and adventure. The genetic condition, which affects roughly one in 5,000 births, causes children to bleed and bruise more easily than others – meaning that a simple cut, scrape, or small surgery can result in uncontrollable and excessive bleeding. While hemophilia is a lifelong condition, breakthroughs in the laboratory are driving novel treatments, and thanks to recently announced grants from the Bayer Hemophilia Awards Program (BHAP), scientists at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia will be able to continue conducting even more investigations.

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Aug 25 2017

Kids First Data Center (DRC), CHOP’s Health Hero, Concussions on Air, Coping for Parents, Madeline Bell Modern Healthcare

CHOP Research In the NewsEvery day, we learn about the exciting new ways our investigators and staff at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia modernize medicine and revolutionize healthcare for children. This week, we’re thrilled to report on a handful of new headlines about those breakthroughs, including a data-driven collaboration led by CHOP that aims to uncover the ties between cancer and birth defects through cloud-sharing technology, Madeline Bell’s recent inclusion into Modern Healthcare’s “100 Most Influential People in Healthcare” for 2017, and how our clinicians are improving community health beyond the clinic. Here are your latest highlights in CHOP research news.

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Aug 23 2017

Mitochondrial Gene Defects Associated With Autism Traced Back to Ancient Times

Differences in mitochondrial function are a major factor in understanding the origins of autism spectrum disorders (ASD), according to a new study led by Douglas Wallace, PhD, director of the Center for Mitochondrial and Epigenomic Medicine at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, that points way back to genetic vulnerabilities accumulated during ancient human migrations.

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Aug 17 2017

Did a New App Facilitate Faster, Easier Dermatology Consults for Families?

Nobody enjoys sitting in a doctor’s waiting room, especially when they have an uncomfortable skin condition. A Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia study team tested a direct-to-consumer mobile app designed to facilitate routine dermatologic consultations for children and adolescents. The pilot study results showed the telemedicine technology was acceptable, easy to use, and expedited care.

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Aug 15 2017

Girl Power: Meet CHOP Research Hero, Brynn Connor

At 2 ½ years old, pediatricians at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia diagnosed Brynn Clare Connor with Rett syndrome, a rare neurodevelopmental disorder that disrupts a child’s communication, coordination, muscle control, and growth over time. Caused by a mutation in the MECP2 gene, Rett syndrome can occur in both genders but almost exclusively affects girls.

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Aug 8 2017

Are We Ready for Self-driving Cars?

Self-driving cars are speedily racing toward becoming an everyday reality, with Congress considering recently introduced bills that would allow the US National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) to oversee the deployment of autonomous vehicles on public roads, pre-empting individual states from issuing local laws.

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Aug 1 2017

Can Electronic Alerts Help Identify Sepsis in Sick Children?

A two-step electronic alert system successfully reduced missed sepsis diagnoses in children by 76 percent. The new pediatric protocol, which incorporates the use of vital signs, risk factors, and a clinician’s judgment, shows promise as a sensitive and specific tool that can help pediatricians working in the emergency department (ED) save lives.

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