December 2016

Monthly Archive: December 2016

Dec 22 2016

‘Tis the Season to Thank Our Research Volunteers

Working at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) during this time of year is incredibly gratifying. In the past few weeks I have heard literally dozens of stories about groups of employees coming together to raise money for charities; conduct drives for food, toys and books; work to help the homeless; and “adopt” families to ensure that children being treated at the hospital and their parents have an enjoyable holiday.

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Dec 20 2016

New Strategies Needed to Reduce Children’s Exposure to Antibiotics

antibioticsSometimes half is better than whole. That’s the idea behind a new multicenter study that Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia is participating in to compare a five-day (short) course of antibiotic therapy with a 10-day (standard) course of therapy to treat community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in children.

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Dec 13 2016

Frankly, My Dear, That’s Clear to an Expert: A Q&A on ‘Frank’ Presentations of Autism

autismThere is an adage that goes, “If you’ve met one person on the autism spectrum, you’ve met one person on the autism spectrum.” Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is so varied in its manifestation of behavioral and social differences that it is hard to make any blanket assumptions about any individual’s abilities, impairments, or interests based on that diagnosis.

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Dec 6 2016

Preserving the Children’s Health Insurance Program: A No-Brainer to Protect Children in Working Families

As a pediatrician, I have a front-row seat to how health insurance impacts the well-being of children. Nearly half the patients I see are covered by Medicaid or the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), both of which have comprehensive sets of benefits and are historically thought of as safety nets for the unemployed.

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Dec 6 2016

Q&A with Sage Myers: How a National System of Health Data Can Improve Care

The relationship between measurement and improvement is a familiar one in our everyday lives. If you wear a fitness tracker to measure your daily step count, you might start changing your habits to walk to more places and get more steps in.

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