September 2016

Monthly Archive: September 2016

Sep 27 2016

Study of Early Reading to Babies Could be a Page-Turner

early readingFrom the moment they’re born until 3 years old, children’s brains grow rapidly, producing 700 new neural connections every second. This a crucial time for parents and caregivers to provide powerful communication with their babies and stimulate brain centers involved with language development and other skills.

Read the rest of this entry >>

Sep 20 2016

Do Food Allergies Increase the Risk of Asthma? Key Questions From a New Study

asthma allergyMost of us know that unlucky kid — and some of us were that unlucky kid — who was stuck with more allergies than the rest of the class, from peanuts and eggs to asthma and hay fever. Is it a coincidence that often the kid carrying an inhaler might also be carrying an EpiPen?

Read the rest of this entry >>

Sep 13 2016

Patients as Partners and the Legacy of Henrietta Lacks: A Q&A with David Lacks

HeLaHenrietta Lacks, a poor black tobacco farmer and loving mother of four children, was an unsung hero for too long. After her doctor collected cells from her cervical cancer tumor in 1951, Henrietta unwittingly had an integral role in the transformation of biomedical research over that past six decades.

Read the rest of this entry >>

Sep 9 2016

CHOP Research In the News: Cancer Moonshot, Why Children Get Cancer, and a Push for Vaccination

CHOP Research In the NewsWelcome back to our weekly roundup of pediatric research news from The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. This week, as many students head back to school, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) is strengthening its advocacy to protect individual and public health by calling for an end to nonmedical exemptions from school vaccine requirements.

Read the rest of this entry >>

Sep 6 2016

New Neuroblastoma Research Scholars Program Supports Young Scientist

EVAN_Foundation_cropYoung scientists may have passion and brilliant ideas, but unfortunately, they often do not add up to federal funding dollars. This is particularly problematic in pediatric cancer research, which receives just 4 percent of the National Cancer Institute’s $4.95 billion budget.

Read the rest of this entry >>