Jan 17 2018

‘Like’ This: PolicyLab Uses Social Media to Support New Moms

From Facebook pages to Twitter feeds, social media has transformed how we communicate and gather news about our world. Seventy-five percent of today’s parents use social media according to a Pew Center Research report, and 79 percent of those parents reported that they learned beneficial information from logging onto their channels. James Guevara, MD, MPH, pediatrician and a founding member of PolicyLab at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, has seen the power of these platforms at work while conducting research into mothers with postpartum depression.

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Jan 12 2018

Birth Defects Awareness, Million Dollar Bike Ride Grant, WAO Center of Excellence, Alopecia and Thyroid Screening, New PolicyLab Video

The new year brings brand-new opportunities to advance pediatric research at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute, and if the first two weeks of 2018 are any indication, our investigators are off to a remarkable start. With January marking National Birth Defects Prevention Month, the Center for Fetal Diagnosis and Treatment at CHOP embarked on a campaign to raise awareness for birth defect treatments and research. Meanwhile, our friends at PolicyLab released an exciting video communicating their passionate mission to improve the well-being of children and families. This week, we also cover new pathways to discovery for conditions both rare and common, from hyperinsulinism to alopecia. If (like us), your new year’s resolution is to stay up to date with the latest CHOP research headlines, you’re in the right place!

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Jan 11 2018

Is Autism Associated With Stronger or Weaker Brain Connections?

The Finding:

In a new study that sheds light on a longstanding paradox in autism research, investigators showed how children and teens with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can have both stronger and weaker brain connections than their typically developing peers. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) revealed that while individuals with ASD have weaker brain connections compared to their peers overall (a measure known as absolute connectivity), they simultaneously exhibited stronger connections within the brain networks implicated in attention and social cognition compared to their other networks (a measure known as relative connectivity). Additionally, the more these brain connections differed from typical development, the more severe the child’s ASD symptoms seemed to be.

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Jan 5 2018

Researchers Take Gaming to a New Level to Help Children With Autism

Each new year comes with anticipation for the latest and greatest in the world of video games to be revealed. Which sequels will surpass their originals? Will beloved characters be reinvented? And we want to know: What brand-new entries are lined up that could offer an amazing experience in field of gaming for health?

The Center for Autism Research (CAR) at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia has several studies in the works that are looking at the feasibility of using video games and virtual reality to help children improve symptoms of autism. With engaging platforms and cutting-edge graphics, these games are aiming for a “high score” as easy-to-access, affordable, and effective interventions for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Here’s a quick glance at what is on the horizon:

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Dec 29 2017

Gene Therapy Makes Headlines, Mitochondrial Medicine, Brain Injury Collaboration, Implicit Racial Bias Blog

After a year of huge headlines for children’s health, we’ve finally arrived at our last roundup of Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia research news for 2017. The latest developments cap off a benchmark year of discovery, with new advances in treating childhood blindness, novel initiatives to study traumatic brain injury, and wonderful stories from a variety of media outlets that highlight the efforts and accomplishments of our Mitochondrial Medicine Frontier Program and The Raymond G. Perelman Center for Cellular and Molecular Therapeutics. We think this edition’s collection of news items herald exciting things to come in 2018!

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Dec 27 2017

Our Most Read Stories of 2017 Bring Back the Wonder of Childhood

It was a big year for children’s health: We celebrated the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s approval of the world’s first chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cell therapy this September, followed closely by approval of the very first gene therapy to treat inherited blindness this month — both of which have their roots at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania. But besides the big headline-making breakthroughs (brilliant as they are), we wanted to know what other stories captivated our readers in 2017.

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Dec 21 2017

Groundbreaking Gene Therapy Approved for Inherited Retinal Blindness

More than a decade of studies led by researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania culminated this week with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s approval of an innovative one-time gene therapy product indicated for the treatment of patients with a rare, inherited form of retinal blindness.

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Dec 20 2017

Planting Seeds of Positivity for Children Exposed to Violence

The health and well-being of the children we treat truly starts at home where they live and play, and with the parents or caregivers whom they return to every day. At Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute, Brittany Schliep, a clinical research finance manager, is fighting for healthier and happier homes by helping to prevent the impact of domestic violence (DV) on children in her hometown of Gloucester Township, N.J.

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Dec 15 2017

Brain Plasticity, Hemophilia B Gene Therapy, Stem Cells and SCD, Medical Cannabis for Autism, PA Rare Disease Advisory Council

The year 2017 might be coming to a close, but research continues to ramp up at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, with exciting developments in the fields of brain science, hemophilia, gene therapy, and more. In this week’s roundup of headlines, we take a look at remarkable reports from CHOP and Penn Medicine about the brain’s ability to reorganize itself after limb amputation, the first U.S. effort to observe the use of medical cannabis for children with autism, and exciting innovations to improve sickle cell disease treatment presented at the 59th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition. Read on to discover more about these brilliant breakthroughs. 

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Dec 12 2017

Positioning PolicyLab for the Future

Editor’s Note: As PolicyLab’s 10th anniversary as a Center of Emphasis within Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute arrives in 2018, we invited Director David Rubin, MD, MSCE, and Deputy Director Meredith Matone, DrPH, MHS, to reflect on PolicyLab’s progress and future directions. Read on to get a glimpse of the four inventive research portfolios that will achieve the Center’s “research-to-action” goals.

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