Feb 18 2019

From Sci-Fi to Real Life, Stefano Rivella, PhD, on the Verge of Discovery

Bundled up in winter clothes from head to toe, 7-year-old Eric rolls a snowball around the backyard with his older brother, building it into a sizeable snowman. Mom, watching from her perch at the kitchen window, can hear her boys laughing — until — Eric doubles over in acute chest pain, crying out for her. Rushing to his side, she wonders how many more of these excruciating episodes and trips to the hospital Eric can endure.

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Feb 14 2019

Researchers Explore How to Promote Firearm Safety in Emergency Department

Pediatric emergency department physicians work at a fast pace to problem solve and provide the right treatment at the right time. Embracing this sense of urgency, physician-researchers with Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia’s Violence Prevention Initiative (VPI) are studying if the ED could be an ideal atmosphere for clinicians to educate patients and families about the risk of firearms, both for unintentional injury and for suicide.

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Feb 12 2019

Informatics Driven Clinical Genomics: Q&A With Mahdi Sarmady, PhD

Scientists are driving new discoveries about the role of genetic variation in specific human disorders at an exciting and unprecedented pace, and physicians are increasingly incorporating genetic tests into pediatric clinics as a diagnostic tool. But with high-throughput sequencing methods continuously yielding floods of new information, how can clinicians keep up with updated data for patients who have already received genetic test results?

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Feb 8 2019

In the News: Newly Linked Epilepsy Genes, Pediatric Safety Research, Teen Intern Recruits for Research, CHOP Visits UAE, Trends in Opioid Prescription

This week, we highlight the results of innovation powered by collaboration, within Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute and around the globe. A multicenter, international consortium revealed genes newly linked to epilepsy, while CHOP CEO Madeline Bell visited Dubai for an interchange of knowledge and technology at the largest medical conference in the world. Closer to home, the Children’s Hospitals’ Solutions for Patient Safety Network, comprised of 135 hospitals in the United States, published its findings on the most effective targets for pediatric patient safety research, and a high school intern helped researchers recruit participants for a teen driving study. Learn about the latest trends in pediatric opioid prescription, and get an update on the Delaney family, whose conjoined twin daughters were separated with painstaking care by a multidisciplinary team at CHOP.

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Feb 6 2019

E-cigarettes, JUUL and Vaping: What Pediatric Health Care Providers Need to Know

Editor’s Note: This guest blog by Brian Jenssen, MD, MSHP, originally appeared on the PolicyLab website. Dr. Jenssen is a faculty member at PolicyLab, an assistant professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Pennsylvania, a practicing primary care pediatrician at CHOP, and Medical Director of Value-Based Care for CHOP’s Care Network (a primary care network for 260,000 pediatric patients in Pennsylvania and New Jersey). His research involves the use of clinical decision support systems and population health management techniques to protect children from secondhand smoke exposure and tobacco use.

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Feb 1 2019

Why Should We Automatically Reanalyze Genetics Test Results?

The findings:

The human genome contains approximately 20,000 genes, and exome analysis focuses on about 7,000 genes known in medical literature to be clinically associated with a disease. Currently, up to 70 percent of exome test reports are negative or inconclusive. But suppose at a later date a researcher discovers a gene that could be causative of the disease? 

Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia researchers led by Avni Santani, PhD, associate professor of Clinical Pathology, developed a useful tool for automated reanalysis that facilitates efficient reevaluation of nondiagnostic clinical exome sequencing (CES) samples using up-to-date literature published after the initial exome analysis was performed. They demonstrated this methodology enabled identification of novel diagnostic findings in almost 16 percent of previously nondiagnostic samples. 

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Jan 30 2019

Borrowing a Weapon From Leukemia’s Arsenal to Develop New Immunotherapy Approaches

More than six years after Emily Whitehead became the first child to receive chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy, doctors have had remarkable success in turning the immune systems of even more children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) into top-notch fighters against the disease. For some patients, however, these superhero T-cells still fail in their mission to find and fight their cancer targets.

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Jan 25 2019

In the News: PA Device Consortium, Suicide Awareness, Future Fertility, Pneumonia Antibiotics, CAR Hosts Family Fun Research Day

If you’re looking for a spark of inspiration during January’s long and sometimes dreary days, don’t miss this week’s roundup of headlines from in and around Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute. Our scientists’ passionate work in the lab found a spotlight in the mainstream media as “TODAY” featured how our stem cell research can help today’s cancer survivors become tomorrow’s parents. Meanwhile, eye-opening findings from the Lifespan Brain Institute (LiBi) sparked a wider conversation about how pediatricians and parents can stay alert for suicidal thoughts in teens. In more news, a recent study highlighted the need for more antibiotic stewardship in non-children’s hospitals, while a successful device consortium based at CHOP officially became a statewide affair.

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Jan 24 2019

New Grant Awarded to Study Driving Among Autistic Teens

As teens transition to adulthood, being able to get around on their own is a big step toward independence, enabling opportunities for social activities, post-secondary education, and work.

But what about this rite of passage for adolescents on the autism spectrum? How does their experience differ from their peers? These are the types of questions Allison Curry, PhD, MPH, wants to answer with the help of a new grant to fund a groundbreaking project that has the potential to help change the lives of many teens and young adults with autism.

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Jan 21 2019

Building the Evidence Base for Treatment of Severe PARDS

Looking into the eyes of a distressed parent, you want to be able to tell them you’re providing interventions that are based on good evidence for the care of their child. When a gap in knowledge prevents that clinical confidence, Martha Curley, RN, PhD, FAAN, pediatric critical care nurse and research scientist, is there to help find answers.

“The main reason I completed a PhD in nursing science was so I could ask and answer questions relevant to the patient population I cared for as a critical care nurse,” said Dr. Curley, professor of nursing and Ruth M. Colket Endowed Chair in Pediatric Nursing, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, and professor of anesthesia and critical care medicine, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

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