Tag Archive: mtDNA

Aug 23 2017

Mitochondrial Gene Defects Associated With Autism Traced Back to Ancient Times

Differences in mitochondrial function are a major factor in understanding the origins of autism spectrum disorders (ASD), according to a new study led by Douglas Wallace, PhD, director of the Center for Mitochondrial and Epigenomic Medicine at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, that points way back to genetic vulnerabilities accumulated during ancient human migrations.

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.research.chop.edu/mitochondrial-gene-defects-associated-autism-traced-back-ancient-times/

Dec 17 2015

Mitochondria Affect How We Respond to Stressful Environments

New research suggests that the tiny structures inside our cells that generate energy, called mitochondria, may play a role in our mind-body interactions and how we respond to stressful environments.

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.research.chop.edu/mitochondria-affect-how-we-respond-to-stressful-environments/

Nov 04 2015

Tiny Mitochondria Play Outsized Role in Human Evolution and Disease

Mitochondria are not only the power plants of our cells; these tiny structures also play a central role in our physiology. Furthermore, by enabling flexible physiological responses to new environments, mitochondria have helped humans and other mammals to adapt and evolve throughout the history of life on earth.

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.research.chop.edu/tiny-mitochondria-play-outsized-role-in-human-evolution-and-disease/

Oct 29 2014

Mitochondria Study Offers Insights into Diseases’ Underlying Causes

Recent work by a mitochondrial medicine pioneer from The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia details how subtle changes in mitochondrial function may cause a broad range of common metabolic and degenerative diseases.

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.research.chop.edu/mitochondria-study-offers-insights-diseases-underlying-causes/

May 31 2013

Mighty Mitochondria

Wallace studies mitochondria, tiny structures that serve as our cells’ “power plants,” converting food and oxygen into energy. Mitochondria are actually symbiotic bacteria that invaded our cells more than 2 billion years ago.

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.research.chop.edu/mighty-mitochondria/