Tag Archive: Babette Zemel

Sep 19 2017

Are Teens Still Building Bone After Attaining Their Adult Height?

Bone mineral accrual doesn’t keep pace with height growth prior to adolescence, according to a national study. After a teenager reaches adult height, bone mineral accrual tends to play catch-up: Roughly 10 percent of bone mass continues to accumulate after height growth is complete. The study findings also suggest that bone growth is site-specific, with bone mineral density developing at different rates in different parts of the skeleton.

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.research.chop.edu/snapshot-science-teens-still-building-bone-attaining-adult-height/

Nov 01 2016

CHOP Honors Superhuman Abilities of Clinical Research Coordinators

Not all superheroes wear masks and capes. At Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, clinical research coordinators are the often-unsung superheroes doing important work in plain clothes and in plain sight.

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.research.chop.edu/chop-honors-superhuman-abilities-clinical-research-coordinators/

Aug 09 2016

“We’re Just Laughing About Poop”: A Clinical Research Study Experience Q&A

Not every child who comes to the hospital is sick. Some of the families who visit The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia on a regular basis are voluntary participants in research studies. Clinical research studies are an essential component of pediatric research that can lead to novel discoveries and advancements for populations in need.

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.research.chop.edu/just-laughing-poop-clinical-research-study-experience-qa/

Jun 17 2016

CHOP Research In the News: New Sleep Times, Plastic Bronchitis, Exercise and Bone Strength, Military Families’ Healthcare Needs

Our news highlights this week include new evidence-based sleep recommendations; a new champion for helping military families navigate children’s healthcare issues; a lifesaving solution to a mysterious surgical side effect; and an encouraging finding to help children predisposed to fragile bones grow up stronger.

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.research.chop.edu/chop-research-news-new-sleep-times-plastic-bronchitis-exercise-bone-strength-military-families-healthcare-needs/

Apr 29 2016

CHOP Research In the News: Plastic Bronchitis, Baby BMI, Voice at the Vatican

Every week is full of discovery at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Among the highlights this week are a significant discovery and new treatment option in a heart surgery complication that affects young patients; a study of how to predict infants’ later obesity risk; and a CHOP cancer immunotherapy story hitting the world stage at an international conference.

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.research.chop.edu/chop-research-news-plastic-bronchitis-baby-bmi-voice-vatican/

Mar 25 2016

CHOP Research In The News: Quantum Award, Bone Health, Antibiotics and Weight Gain

News abounds this first week of spring, and we bring you fresh insights from new scientific studies cultivated by experts at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. But first, take a moment to celebrate a special award that recognizes the dedication of pediatric oncologist Richard Aplenc, MD, PhD, MSCE.

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.research.chop.edu/chop-research-in-the-news-quantum-award-bone-health-antibiotics-and-weight-gain/

Mar 24 2016

Researchers Examine Obesity, Cardiovascular Risks in Down Syndrome

Children with Down syndrome (also known as Trisomy 21) are prone to obesity. Their families may be concerned about their future risks for cardiovascular problems as well as their quality of life.

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.research.chop.edu/researchers-examine-obesity-cardiovascular-risks-in-down-syndrome/

Dec 22 2015

Going Back to the Future of Obesity and Osteoporosis

Many of today’s healthy children and teens will develop later-onset chronic conditions including heart disease, cancer, and osteoporosis.

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.research.chop.edu/going-back-future-obesity-osteoporosis/

Nov 11 2015

New Growth Charts for Down Syndrome a Tall Order

Pediatricians have long known that children with Down syndrome grow differently than typical children, but the last growth charts for children with Down syndrome were developed almost 30 years ago.

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.research.chop.edu/new-growth-charts-for-down-syndrome-a-tall-order/