Category Archive: Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia

Jul 18 2017

Do Researchers Need Standardized Dosing for Infant Anticancer Drug Trials?

Researchers from the Children’s Oncology Group (COG) have developed a new standardized dosing method for anticancer drugs in infants to use across all COG clinical trials. This unified method, based on dose banding and organized into tables for different drugs and dose levels, will address the limitations and variability that researchers can encounter in current methods.

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.research.chop.edu/researchers-need-standardized-dosing-infant-anticancer-drug-trials/

Jul 11 2017

How Peacekeeper Cells Prevent Autoimmune Disease: Q&A with The Oliver Lab

In the lab of Paula Oliver, PhD, associate professor of Pathology at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, a group of researchers led by Awo Layman, PhD; Guoping Deng, PhD; and Claire O’Leary, PhD, studied the influential events that transpire when, as Dr. Layman described it to us, a type of immune cell called a regulatory T cell suffers a “loss of identity.”

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.research.chop.edu/peacekeeper-cells-prevent-autoimmune-disease-qa-oliver-lab/

Jun 28 2017

U.S. News National Survey Ranks CHOP Specialty Areas in Top Ten

Three cheers for our Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia team for once again achieving outstanding rankings in the U.S. News & World Report 11th annual Best Children’s Hospitals rankings. CHOP earned second place on the Honor Roll, a distinction awarded to pediatric centers that deliver exceptionally high-quality care across multiple specialties.

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.research.chop.edu/u-s-news-national-survey-ranks-chop-specialty-areas-top-ten/

Jun 13 2017

Do Assault-injured Youth Want Mental Health Care?

The majority of adolescent males receiving care in the pediatric emergency department after experiencing a violence-related injury — typically from peer assaults — felt they needed mental health services, according to a study by researchers from the Violence Intervention Program (VIP) at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.research.chop.edu/snapshot-science-assault-injured-youth-want-mental-health-care/

Jun 09 2017

Could a Single Brain Scan Predict Autism Among High-risk Infants?

A neuroimaging scan at age 6 months may accurately predict autism spectrum disorder (ASD) among high-risk infants. The infants were considered to be at high risk because they had older siblings with ASD. Overall, the study team found 974 functional connections in the 6-month-olds’ brains that were associated with autism-related behaviors.

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.research.chop.edu/snapshot-science-single-brain-scan-predict-autism-among-high-risk-infants/

May 23 2017

Do the Effects of Neonatal Caffeine Therapy Persist in Middle School?

Caffeine therapy can help premature babies breathe stronger and sooner on their own. When a group of caffeine-treated premature babies reached middle school, the therapy appeared to reduce their risk of motor impairment – building on earlier follow-ups that show the treatment’s safety, efficacy, and developmental benefits for the babies at one-and-a-half years old.

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.research.chop.edu/snapshot-science-effects-neonatal-caffeine-therapy-persist-middle-school/

May 16 2017

Five Things to Know About How Orexin Affects Stress Resilience

What’s going on inside our bodies and brains when we respond to stress? Previously, we covered research into powerful little neuropeptides called orexins that may help regulate an individual’s vulnerability to stress. Now, we dug into fresh research from the lab of Seema Bhatnagar, PhD, an associate professor in the division of Stress Neurobiology at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, and conducted by Laura Grafe, PhD, a postdoctoral fellow.

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.research.chop.edu/five-things-know-orexin-affects-stress-resilience/

Apr 18 2017

Could Noninvasive Eye Imaging Safely Detect Elevated Intracranial Pressure, Without Surgery?

Taking light-wave images of the retina through a process called optical coherence tomography (OCT) shows promise as a safe, noninvasive way to identify elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) in children with subacute conditions such as tumors, hydrocephalus, or head trauma.

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.research.chop.edu/noninvasive-eye-imaging-safely-detect-elevated-intracranial-pressure-without-surgery/

Apr 11 2017

Flaura Winston Recognized With 2017 Women in Business Healthcare Awards

Dr. Winston was recognized as the “Best Children’s Health Executive” and “Best Child Healthcare Service & Pediatrician of the Year 2017” for the state of Pennsylvania from the UK-based publication, Women In Business Worldwide.

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.research.chop.edu/flaura-winston-recognized-2017-women-business-healthcare-awards/

Apr 06 2017

Multiple Sclerosis Research Program Inspires Patient to Pursue Science Career

For some patients, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia is more than just the place they visited for check-ups, MRI’s, and medical tests: It’s the spark of inspiration that encouraged them to study medicine, science, or research and kick-start a career in healthcare.

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.research.chop.edu/multiple-sclerosis-research-program-inspires-patient-pursue-science-career/

Older posts «