Category Archive: Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia

Jun 13 2017

Do Assault-injured Youth Want Mental Health Care?

The majority of adolescent males receiving care in the pediatric emergency department after experiencing a violence-related injury — typically from peer assaults — felt they needed mental health services, according to a study by researchers from the Violence Intervention Program (VIP) at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.research.chop.edu/snapshot-science-assault-injured-youth-want-mental-health-care/

Jun 09 2017

Could a Single Brain Scan Predict Autism Among High-risk Infants?

A neuroimaging scan at age 6 months may accurately predict autism spectrum disorder (ASD) among high-risk infants. The infants were considered to be at high risk because they had older siblings with ASD. Overall, the study team found 974 functional connections in the 6-month-olds’ brains that were associated with autism-related behaviors.

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.research.chop.edu/snapshot-science-single-brain-scan-predict-autism-among-high-risk-infants/

May 23 2017

Do the Effects of Neonatal Caffeine Therapy Persist in Middle School?

Caffeine therapy can help premature babies breathe stronger and sooner on their own. When a group of caffeine-treated premature babies reached middle school, the therapy appeared to reduce their risk of motor impairment – building on earlier follow-ups that show the treatment’s safety, efficacy, and developmental benefits for the babies at one-and-a-half years old.

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.research.chop.edu/snapshot-science-effects-neonatal-caffeine-therapy-persist-middle-school/

May 16 2017

Five Things to Know About How Orexin Affects Stress Resilience

What’s going on inside our bodies and brains when we respond to stress? Previously, we covered research into powerful little neuropeptides called orexins that may help regulate an individual’s vulnerability to stress. Now, we dug into fresh research from the lab of Seema Bhatnagar, PhD, an associate professor in the division of Stress Neurobiology at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, and conducted by Laura Grafe, PhD, a postdoctoral fellow.

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.research.chop.edu/five-things-know-orexin-affects-stress-resilience/

Apr 18 2017

Could Noninvasive Eye Imaging Safely Detect Elevated Intracranial Pressure, Without Surgery?

Taking light-wave images of the retina through a process called optical coherence tomography (OCT) shows promise as a safe, noninvasive way to identify elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) in children with subacute conditions such as tumors, hydrocephalus, or head trauma.

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.research.chop.edu/noninvasive-eye-imaging-safely-detect-elevated-intracranial-pressure-without-surgery/

Apr 11 2017

Flaura Winston Recognized With 2017 Women in Business Healthcare Awards

Dr. Winston was recognized as the “Best Children’s Health Executive” and “Best Child Healthcare Service & Pediatrician of the Year 2017” for the state of Pennsylvania from the UK-based publication, Women In Business Worldwide.

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.research.chop.edu/flaura-winston-recognized-2017-women-business-healthcare-awards/

Apr 06 2017

Multiple Sclerosis Research Program Inspires Patient to Pursue Science Career

For some patients, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia is more than just the place they visited for check-ups, MRI’s, and medical tests: It’s the spark of inspiration that encouraged them to study medicine, science, or research and kick-start a career in healthcare.

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.research.chop.edu/multiple-sclerosis-research-program-inspires-patient-pursue-science-career/

Dec 06 2016

Q&A with Sage Myers: How a National System of Health Data Can Improve Care

The relationship between measurement and improvement is a familiar one in our everyday lives. If you wear a fitness tracker to measure your daily step count, you might start changing your habits to walk to more places and get more steps in.

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.research.chop.edu/qa-sage-myers-national-system-health-data-can-improve-care/

Oct 04 2016

How to Address Four Factors That Limit Gender Equality in Academic Medicine

After four years of often being the only female student in a class, entering a medical school felt like a gender nirvana. My medical school, like most, had equal numbers of men and women. But despite my initial impression of gender equity, I realized that there are still gender obstacles in medicine.

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.research.chop.edu/address-four-factors-limit-gender-equality-academic-medicine/

Jul 13 2016

How Warts Could Reveal the Immune System’s Tiny Flaws and Functions

Medical students have a classic rule of thumb on the subject of choosing their specialty: If you’re undecided between obstetrics and pediatrics, the moment of truth will happen right after you deliver a baby for the first time. In that exhilarating moment of helping a mother welcome a new life, do you want to stay as the obstetrician at the mom’s bedside, or do you want to follow the baby?

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.research.chop.edu/warts-reveal-immune-systems-tiny-flaws-functions/

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