Sep 30 2016

CHOP Research In the News: New Era of Genetics, Grant Awards, Texting Cancer Survivors, Baby Teeth and Autism

CHOP Research NewsA new month is about to begin, so it seems fitting that this week’s research highlights have lots of “new” initiatives that we’re excited to report. A new Collaborative will broaden the scope of genetics medicine at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Three new grants will help CHOP researchers make advances in pediatric cancer. A study is taking a new mHealth approach by using text messages to help cancer survivors stay healthy. And a new national consortium is looking at the chemical composition of lost baby teeth for clues to possible autism risk factors.

Read the rest of this entry »

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.research.chop.edu/chop-research-news-new-era-genetics-grant-awards-texting-cancer-survivors-baby-teeth-autism/

Sep 27 2016

Study of Early Reading to Babies Could be a Page-Turner

early readingFrom the moment they’re born until 3 years old, children’s brains grow rapidly, producing 700 new neural connections every second. This a crucial time for parents and caregivers to provide powerful communication with their babies and stimulate brain centers involved with language development and other skills.

Insufficient parent-child verbal interaction is the most likely cause for language delays, which occur in approximately 13 percent of children under the age of 3 according to a recent estimate, especially those living in low-income areas. Looking to decrease these delays, a research team at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia is conducting a new study that will test the effects of initiating a literacy program called Reach Out and Read (ROR) in the newborn period, six months sooner than it is standardly begun.

Read the rest of this entry »

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.research.chop.edu/study-early-reading-babies-page-turner/

Sep 23 2016

CHOP Research In the News: Emmy Award, Kids and the Cancer Moonshot, Precision Approach to Epilepsy, Concussion Monitoring App

CHOP Research In the NewsThis week we’re all about getting smart in our highlights of research news from The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Getting smart in the approach to tackling childhood cancer means identifying strategies that will make a decade’s progress in half the time — which is exactly the focus of the national Cancer Moonshot. Another new story this week highlights a smart approach to precision therapies for neurological diseases, which involves delving into the genetic causes of epilepsy and finding drugs that target the molecular pathways involved. And smart monitoring of how youth truly fare after a concussion entails checking on their activities and their symptoms in real time — exactly the approach just demonstrated to work with a pilot study of a mobile app. Check out the details of the stories below, but first, share in our excitement about an amazing accomplishment.

Read the rest of this entry »

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.research.chop.edu/chop-research-news-emmy-award-kids-cancer-moonshot-precision-approach-epilepsy-concussion-monitoring-app/

Sep 20 2016

Do Food Allergies Increase the Risk of Asthma? Key Questions From a New Study

asthma allergyMost of us know that unlucky kid — and some of us were that unlucky kid — who was stuck with more allergies than the rest of the class, from peanuts and eggs to asthma and hay fever. Is it a coincidence that often the kid carrying an inhaler might also be carrying an EpiPen? Many parents and pediatricians have noted anecdotally, and small studies have supported, the idea that food allergies and respiratory allergies tend to occur together. The connection appears to be real, according to a new, large-scale epidemiological study by a multidisciplinary team of researchers at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.

Read the rest of this entry »

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.research.chop.edu/food-allergies-increase-risk-asthma-key-questions-new-study/

Sep 16 2016

CHOP Research In the News: Precision Health, Passenger Distraction, Stand Up to Cancer Telecast

CHOP Research In the NewsMany scientific endeavors take place quietly behind laboratory walls, but this week’s In the News items are worth shouting about. A genomics expert will share his insights about CHOP’s precision medicine experience at the inaugural Advances in Genome Biology and Technology meeting. Driving safety researchers asked teens to speak up about their perceptions of passenger distraction. And the Stand Up to Cancer Telecast celebrated a patient from CHOP who was diagnosed with an aggressive form of leukemia. The fundraiser generated $111 million in pledges to accelerate cancer research. Go ahead, and make some noise!

Read the rest of this entry »

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.research.chop.edu/chop-research-news-precision-health-passenger-distraction-stand-cancer-telecast/

Sep 13 2016

Patients as Partners and the Legacy of Henrietta Lacks: A Q&A with David Lacks

HeLaHenrietta Lacks, a poor black tobacco farmer and loving mother of four children, was an unsung hero for too long. After her doctor collected cells from her cervical cancer tumor in 1951, Henrietta unwittingly had an integral role in the transformation of biomedical research over that past six decades. The cells, known as HeLa, were the first human cells to grow and divide continuously in the lab, making research on tissue culture possible and contributing to many huge advances in medicine, such as the development of modern vaccines and cancer therapies.

Yet, for 20 years after Henrietta’s death from her cancer, the Lacks family had no idea that her cells were still alive and powering medical advances. For decades beyond that, they did not benefit from these medical advances or from Henrietta’s contribution in any way — even in public awareness and credit for her legacy.

Read the rest of this entry »

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.research.chop.edu/patients-partners-legacy-henrietta-lacks-qa-david-lacks/

Sep 09 2016

CHOP Research In the News: Cancer Moonshot, Why Children Get Cancer, and a Push for Vaccination

CHOP Research In the NewsWelcome back to our weekly roundup of pediatric research news from The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. This week, as many students head back to school, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) is strengthening its advocacy to protect individual and public health by calling for an end to nonmedical exemptions from school vaccine requirements. This was also a big week for cancer research, as the National Cancer Institute (NCI) accepted and published the recommendations of its Blue Ribbon Panel for how to achieve the Cancer Moonshot initiative’s goals of making 10 years of progress against cancer in the next five years. These stories and more follow below.

Read the rest of this entry »

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.research.chop.edu/chop-research-news-cancer-moonshot-children-get-cancer-push-vaccination/

Sep 06 2016

New Neuroblastoma Research Scholars Program Supports Young Scientist

EVAN_Foundation_cropYoung scientists may have passion and brilliant ideas, but unfortunately, they often do not add up to federal funding dollars. This is particularly problematic in pediatric cancer research, which receives just 4 percent of the National Cancer Institute’s $4.95 billion budget.

Enter the Evan’s Victory Against Neuroblastoma Foundation (The EVAN Foundation) into the equation. In 2015, the foundation established the Evan Lindberg Neuroblastoma Research Scholars Program to support exceptional early career scientists at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia who are dedicated to finding a cure for neuroblastoma. A rare childhood cancer that 700 new patients are diagnosed with each year in the U.S., neuroblastoma is a tumor of nerve tissue that typically presents in the adrenal gland.

Read the rest of this entry »

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.research.chop.edu/new-neuroblastoma-research-scholars-program-supports-young-scientist/

Sep 02 2016

CHOP Research In the News: $1 Million Gift, Airplane Safety, Type 2 Diabetes Gene, Thyroid Disorders

CHOP Research NewsThis week’s In the News roundup takes science at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia to new elevations, including a stellar donation by the Eagles Charitable Foundation to support autism research. (Go Birds!) A biomechanics researcher posts a blog that looks skyward to new airplane safety recommendations for children who travel. Sophisticated genomics research takes us on a trip of discovery full of twists and turns. And a scientific review brings us back down to earth, providing solid ground for pediatricians to recognize thyroid problems.

Read the rest of this entry »

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.research.chop.edu/chop-research-news-1-million-gift-airplane-safety-type-2-diabetes-gene-thyroid-disorders/

Aug 30 2016

Investigators Put Their Studies Into Drive With CPCE Pilot Grants

CPCEConducting a pilot research study is like test-driving a new car. Pilot studies build preliminary evidence and allow for investigators to ensure everything runs smoothly before committing to an extensive, large-scale study. Three investigators at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia are getting the funding they need to get their research ideas on the road, thanks to the CHOP Research Institute’s Center for Pediatric Clinical Effectiveness (CPCE).

The CPCE Pilot Grant Program offers funding opportunities twice a year to CHOP investigators conducting clinical effectiveness studies. The recipient of the Fall 2015 Pilot Grant Award was Nicolas Bamat, MD, and the two recipients of the Spring 2016 award were Sagori Mukhopadhyay, MD, MMSc, and David I. Chu, MD.

Read on to learn more about the awardees and their studies.

Read the rest of this entry »

Permanent link to this article: http://blog.research.chop.edu/investigators-put-studies-drive-cpce-pilot-grants/

Older posts «